Blinking snake

A Mayan Bibliography

Constellation band

blood scroll

This bibliography contains only items that I own; it contains mostly references to the Maya, but there’s also Aztec, Inca, American Indian, Archaeoastronomical, Astronomical, Calendrical, a little fiction and some mathematical/computer references. There’s a smattering of Egyptian, Decipherment, Alphabets and Writing, and Linguistic information, too.

I think most of what I have is listed, but there are at least a couple of SF novels I can’t find in my library. .

  1. Quist, Linda, The Maya Glypher’s Companion, Privately Published by the Author, Alexandria VA, 1993.
  2. Aveni, A. F., ed., Archaeoastronomy in the New World, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1982.
    1. Aveni, A. F., “Archaeastronomy in the Maya Region: 1970-1980,” p. 1.
    2. McCluskey, S. C., “Historical Archaeoastronomy: The Hopi Example,” p. 31.
    3. Zuidema, R. T., “The Sidereal Lunar Calendar of the Incas,” p. 59.
    4. Brotherston, G., “Astronomical Norms in MesoAmerican Ritual and Time-Reckoning,” p. 109.
    5. Lounsbury, F. G., “Astronomical Knowledge and its Uses at Bonampak, Mexico,” p. 143.
    6. Doggett, L. E., R. M. Sinclair and A. Sofaer, “Lunar Markings on Fajada Butte, Chaco Canyon,” p. 169.
    7. Chamberlain, V. D., “The Skidi Pawnee Earth Lodge as an Observatory,” p. 183.
    8. Murray, W. B., “Calendrical Petroglyphs of Northern Mexico,” p. 195.
    9. Williamson, R. A., “Casa Rinconada, Twelfth Century Anasazi Kiva,” p. 205.
  3. Schele, Linda, Maya Glyphs: The Verbs, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1982.
  4. Williamson, Ray A., ed., Archaeoastronomy in the Americas, Center for Archaeoastronomy, 1981.
    1. Eddy, John A., “Some Thoughts on Archaeoastronomy Today,” p. 21.
    2. Aveni, Anthony F., “Archaeoastronomy Today,” p. 25.
    3. Zuidema, R. T., “Anthropology and Archaeoastronomy,” p. 29.
    4. Hartung, Horst, “The Role of Architecture and Planning in Archaeoastronomy,” p. 33.
    5. Hicks, Ronald, “Archaeoastronomy and Related Problems: Old World Approaches vs. New,” p. 43.
    6. Carlson, John B., “Archaeoastronomy and Education,” p. 51.
    7. Krupp, E. C., “A Glance into the Smoking Mirror,” p. 55.
    8. Williamson, Ray A., “North America: A Multiplicity of Astronomies,” p. 61.
    9. Autrey, Nev E., and Wanda R. Autrey, “Zodiac Ridge,” p. 81.
    10. Daniel-Hartung, Ann L., “Archaeoastronomy at a Selection of Mississippian Sites in the Southeastern United States,” p. 101.
    11. Dix, Bryon E., and James W. Mavor, Jr., “Two Possible Calendar Sites in Vermont,” p. 111.
    12. Evans, John H., and Harry Hillman, “Documentation of Some Lunar and Solar Events in Casa Grande, Arizona,” p. 133.
    13. Farrer, Claire, and Bernard Second, “Living the Sky: Aspects of Mescalero Apache Ethnoastronomy,” p. 137.
    14. Hedges, Ken, “Winter Solstice Observatory Sites in Kumeyaay Territory, San Diego County, California,” p. 151.
    15. Heilman, James M., and Roger R. Hoefer, “Possible Astronomical Alignments in a Fort Ancient Settlement at the Incinerator Site in Dayton, Ohio,” p. 157.
    16. McCluskey, Stephen C., “Transformations of the Hopi Calendar,” p. 173.
    17. Williamson, Ray A., and M. Jane Young, “Ethnoastronomy: The Zuni Case,” p. 183.
    18. Remington, Judith Ann, “Mesoamerican Archaeoastronomy: Parallax, Perspective, and Focus,” p. 193.
    19. Carlson, John B., “Numerology and the Astronomy of the Maya,” p. 205.
    20. Collea, Beth A., “The Celestial Bands in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing,” p. 215.
    21. Lamb, Weldon W., “Star Lore in the Yucatec Maya Dictionaries,” p. 233.
    22. Malmstrom, Vincent H., “Architecture, Astronomy, and Calendrics in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica,” p. 249.
    23. Milbrath, Susan, “Astronomical Imagery in the Serpent Sequence of the Madrid Codex,” p. 263.
    24. Urton, Gary, “The Use of Native Cosmologies in Archaeoastronomical Studies: The View from South America,” p. 285.
    25. Aveni, Anthony F., “Horizon Astronomy in Incaic Cuzco,” p. 305.
    26. Zuidema, R. T., “Inca Observations of the Solar and Lunar Passages Through Zenith and Anti-Zenith at Cuzco,” p. 319.
    27. Hicks, Ronald, “Irish Henge Orientation: Preliminary Results and Some Problems,” p. 343.
    28. Smith, T. Scott, “Teaching the History of Astronomy, or Seven Challenges for Archaeoastronomy,” p. 351.
  5. Aveni, Anthony F., ed., Archaeoastronomy in Pre-Columbian America , University of Texas Press, Austin, 1975.
    1. Coe, Michael D., “Native Astronomy in Mesoamerica,” p. 3.
    2. Cochran, Clarion, Howard J. Fisher, Abigail F. Williamson and Ray A. Williamson, “The Astronomical Record in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico,” p. 33.
    3. Brandt, John C., Von Del Chamberlain, Clarion Cochran, Robert S. Harrington, Muriel Kennedy, William J. Kennedy, Stephen P. Maran and Ray A. Williamson, “Possible Rock Art Records of the Crab Nebula Supernova in the Western United States,” p. 45.
    4. Ellis, Florence Hawley, “A Thousand Years of the Pueblo Sun-Moon-Star Calendar,” p. 59.
    5. Britt, Claude Jr., “Early Navajo Astronomical Pictographs in Canyon de Chelly, Northeastern Arizona, U. S. A.,” p. 89.
    6. Mayer, Dorothy, “Star-Patterns in Great Basin Petroglyphs,” p. 109.
    7. Hawkins, Gerald S., “Astroarchaeology: The Unwritten Evidence,” p. 131.
    8. Aveni, Anthony F., “Possible Astronomical Orientations in Ancient Mesoamerica,” p. 163.
    9. Hartung, Horst, “A Scheme of Possible Astronomical Projections in Mesoamerican Architecture,” p. 191.
    10. Reyman, Jonathan, “The Nature and Nurture of Archaeoastronomical Studies,” p. 205.
    11. Cowan, Thaddeus M., “Effigy Mounds and Stellar Representation: A Comparison of Old World and New World Alignment Schemes,” p. 217.
    12. Owen, Nancy Kelly, “The Use of Eclipse Data to Determine the Maya Correlation Number,” p. 237.
    13. Smiley, Charles H., “The Solar Eclipse Warning Table in the Dresden Codex,” p. 247.
    14. Kelley, David H., “Planetary Data on Caracol Stela 3,” p. 257.
    15. de Leonard, Carmen Cook, “A New Astronomical Interpretation of the Four Ballcourt Panels at Tajin, Mexico,” p. 263.
    16. Hatch, Marion Popenoe, “An Astronomical Calendar in a Portion of the Madrid Codex,” p. 283.
    17. Marshack, Alexander, “Olmec Mosaic Pendant,” p. 341.
    18. Baity, Elizabeth Chesley, “Mesoamerican Archaeoastronomy So Far,” p. 379.
  6. Closs, Michael P., ed., Native American Mathematics, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1986.
    1. Closs, Michael P., “Native American Number Systems,” p. 3.
    2. Murray, William Breen, “Numerical Representations in North American Rock Art,” p. 45.
    3. Gnerre, Maurizio Covaz, “Some Notes on Quantification and Numerals in an Amazon Indian Language,” p. 71.
    4. Folan, William J., “The Calendrical and Numerical Systems of the Nootka,” p. 93.
    5. Beeler, Madison S., “Chumash Numerals,” p. 109.
    6. Denny, J. Peter, “Cultural Ecology of Mathematics: Ojibway and Inuit Hunters,” p. 129.
    7. Closs, Michael P., “Tallies and the Ritual Use of Number in Ojibway Pictography,” p. 181.
    8. Closs, Michael P., and Stanley E. Payne, “A Survey of Aztec Numbers and Their Uses,” p. 213.
    9. Harvey, Herbert R., and Barbara J. Williams, “Decipherment and Some Implications of Aztec Numerical Glyphs,” p. 237.
    10. Ascher, Marcia, “Mathematical Ideas of the Incas,” p. 261.
    11. Closs, Michael P., “The Mathematical Notation of the Ancient Maya,” p. 291.
    12. Seidenberg, A., “The Zero in the Mayan Numerical Notation,” p. 371.
    13. Vinette, Francine, “In Search of Mesoamerican Geometry,” p. 387.
  7. Thompson, J. Eric, “Maya Chronology: Glyph G of the Lunar Series,” American Anthropologist n. s., 31, 1929: p. 223-31.
  8. Gates, William E., “Commentary Upon the Maya-Tzental Perez Codex,” in Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Vol. VI, no. 1, Peabody Museum, 1910, pp. 3-64.
  9. Guthe, Carl E., “A Possible Solution of the Number Series on Pages 51 to 58 of the Dresden Codex,” in Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Vol. VI, no. 2, Peabody Museum, 1921, pp. 1-33.
  10. Wilson, Robert W., “Astronomical Notes on the Maya Codices,” in Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Vol. VI, no. 3, Peabody Museum, 1924, pp. 1-46, pl. 1-9.
  11. Spinden, Herbert J., “The Reduction of Maya Dates,” in Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Vol. VI, no. 4, Peabody Museum, 1924, pp. 1-286.
  12. Philip, Alexander, The Calendar: Its History, Structure and Improvement, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1921.
  13. Thompson, J. Eric, “Maya Chronology: The Correlation Question,” in Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume III, Nos. 13 to 19, Carnegie Institution of Washington, No. 14, 1937, pp. 51-104.
  14. Schlak, Arthur, “Moon-Ages with a Hand-Held Calculator,” in Contributions to Maya Hieroglyphic Decipherment, 1, Stephen D. Houston, ed., HRAFlex Books, 1983, pp. 80-87.
  15. ?? Explanatory Supplement to The Astronomical Ephemeris, excerpts.
  16. Caso, Alfonso, “Calendrical Systems of Central Mexico,” in Handbook of Middle American Indians, ed., Robert Wauchope, Archaeology of Northern Mesoamerica, ed., Gordon Willey, Chapter 13. University of Texas Press, Austin, 1965, pp. 333-348.
  17. Parise, Frank, The Book of Calendars, excerpts.
  18. Lounsbury, Floyd G., “Maya Numeration, Computation, and Calendrical Astronomy,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), Scribners, New York, 1978 (Maya File 316e).
  19. Rose, Paul Lawrence, “Scaliger (Bordonius), Julius Caesar,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), Scribners, New York, 1978, 134-136.
  20. Pingree, David, “History of Mathematical Astronomy in India,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), Scribners, New York, 1978.
  21. Oppenheim, A. Leo, “Man and Nature in Mesopotamian Civilization,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), New York, Scribners, 1978.
  22. van der Waerden, B. L., “Mathematics and Astronomy in Mesopotamia,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), Scribners, New York, 1978.
  23. Gillings, R. J., “The Mathematics of Ancient Egypt,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), Scribners, New York, 1978.
  24. Parker, Richard A., “Egyptian Astronomy, Astrology, and Calendrical Reckoning,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), Scribners, New York, 1978.
  25. Nakayama, Shigeru, “Japanese Scientific Thought,” in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, ed., Charles Coulston Gillespie, Vol. 15, Supplement 1 (1978), Scribners, New York, 1978.
  26. Ifrah, George, From One to Zero, Penguin, New York, 1981.
  27. Coe, Michael D., The Maya Scribe and His World, The Grolier Club, New York, 1973.
  28. Coe, Michael D., The Maya: 4th Edition, Fully Revised, Thames and Hudson, London, 1987. (1st Edition published in 1966.)
  29. Coe, Michael D., The Maya: 5th Edition, Fully Revised and Expanded, Thames and Hudson, London, 1993 (1st Edition published in 1966).
  30. Coe, Michael D., Breaking the Maya Code, Thames and Hudson, London, 1992.
  31. Coe, Michael D., Breaking the Maya Code, Revised, Thames and Hudson, London, 1999.
  32. unk., “Calendrical Systems,” in Britannica III (15th Edition, 1980): Volume 3, pp 595-612.
  33. Morley, Sylvanus Griswold, An Introduction to the Study of the Mayan Hieroglyphics, Bulletin 57 of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution, U. S. Government Printing Office, 1915 (Dover reprint).
  34. Krupp, E. C., ed., In Search of Ancient Astronomies, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1978.
    1. Krupp, E. C., “A Sky for All Seasons,” p. 1.
    2. Thom, Alexander, and Archibald Stevenson Thom, “Rings and Menhirs: Geometry and Astronomy in the Neolithic Age,” p. 39.
    3. Krupp, E. C., “The Stonehenge Chronicles,” p. 81.
    4. Eddy, John A., “Archaeoastronomy of North America: Cliffs, Mounds, and Medicine Wheels,” p. 133.
    5. Aveni, Anthony F., “Astronomy in Ancient Mesoamerica,” p. 165.
    6. Krupp, E. C., “Astronomers, Pyramids, and Priests,” p. 203.
    7. Krupp, E. C., “Observatories of the Gods and Other Astronomical Fantasies,” p. 241.
  35. Kolata, Alan L., and Richard M. Leventhal, eds., Civilization in the Ancient Americas, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, 1983.
    1. Hammond, Norman, “Lords of the Jungle: A Prosopography of Maya Archaeology,” p. 3.
    2. Healy, Paul F., “The Paleoecology of the Selin Farm Site (H-CN-5): Department of Colon, Honduras,” p. 35.
    3. Pohl, Mary, “Maya Ritual Faunas: Vertebrate Remains from Burials, Caches, Cave, and Cenotes in the Maya Lowlands,” p. 55.
    4. Robertson, Robin, “Functional Analysis and Social Process in Ceramics: The Pottery from Cerros, Belize,” p. 105.
    5. Parsons, Lee A., “Altars 9 and 10, Kaminaljuyu, and the Evolution of the Serpent-Winged Deity,” p. 145.
    6. Kelley, David H., “The Maya Calendar Correlation Problem,” p. 157.
    7. Bawden, Garth, “Cultural Reconstitution in the Late Moche Period: A Case Study in Multidimensional Stylistic Analysis,” p. 211.
    8. Topic, John R., and Theresa Lange Topic, “Coast-Highland Relations in Northern Peru: Some Observations on Routes, Networks, and Scales of Interaction,” p. 237.
    9. Fash, William L. Jr., “Deducing Social Organization from Classic Maya Settlement Patterns: A Case Study from the Copan Valley,” p. 261.
    10. Feldman, Robert A., “From Maritime Chiefdom to Agricultural State in Formative Coastal Peru,” p. 289.
    11. Cowgill, George L., “Rulership and the Ciudadela: Political Inferences from Teotihuacan Architecture,” p. 313.
    12. Kolata, Alan L., “Chan Chan and Cuzco: On the Nature of the Ancient Andean City,” p. 345.
    13. Conrad, Geoffrey, and Arthur Demarest, “Ideological Adaptation and the Rise of the Aztec and Inca Empires,” p. 373.
  36. von Hagen, Victor W., The Aztec: Man and Tribe, New American Library, New York, 1958.
  37. von Hagen, Victor W., World of the Maya, New American Library, New York, 1960.
  38. Ferguson, William M., and John Q. Royce, Maya Ruins of Mexico in Color, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1977.
  39. Ferguson, William M. and Arthur H. Rohn, Mesoamerica’s Ancient Cities, University Press of Colorado, Niwot, Colorado, 1990.
  40. Mallan, Chicki, Guide to the Yucatan Peninsula, Moon Publications, Chico, California, 1986.
  41. Sten, Maria, Codices of Mexico and Their Extraordinary History, Panorama, Mexico City, Mexico, 1972.
  42. Fernandez, Adela, Pre-Hispanic Gods of Mexico: Myths and Deities from Nahuatl Mythology, Panorama, Mexico City, Mexico, 1984.
  43. Bingham, Hiram, Lost City of the Incas: The Story of Machu Picchu and Its Builders, Atheneum, New York, 1948.
  44. Jean, Georges, Signs, Symbols, and Ciphers, Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York, 1989/1998.
  45. Barnett, Jo Ellen, Time’s Pendulum, Harcourt Brace and Company, New York, 1998.
  46. Nelson, Ralph, trans., Popol Vuh: The Great Mythological Book of the Ancient Maya, Houghton Mifflin, New York, 1974.
  47. Miller, Mary Ellen, The Art of Mesoamerica: From Olmec to Aztec, Thames and Hudson, London, 1986.
  48. Miller, Mary Ellen, Maya Art and Architecture, Thames and Hudson, London, 1999.
  49. Thompson, J. Eric S., The Civilization of the Mayas, seventh edition, Field Museum of Natural History, 1973 (first edition 1927).
  50. Hawkins, Gerald S., and John B. White, Stonehenge Decoded, Dell, New York, 1965.
  51. Hawkins, Gerald S., Beyond Stonehenge, Dorset Press, New York, 1973.
  52. Morley, Sylvanus G., The Ancient Maya, second edition, Stanford University Press, Stanford University, California, 1947 (1st edition 1946).
  53. Krupp, E. C., Echoes of the Ancient Skies: The Astronomy of Lost Civilizations, Harper & Row, New York, 1983.
  54. Stuart, Gene S., and George E. Stuart, The Mysterious Maya, National Geographic Society, Washington, D. C., 1977.
  55. Stuart, Gene S., The Mighty Aztecs, National Geographic Society, Washington, D. C., 1981.
  56. McIntyre, Loren, The Incredible Incas and Their Timeless Land, National Geographic Society, Washington, D. C., 1975.
  57. Farriss, Nancy M., Maya Society Under Colonial Rule, Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, 1984.
  58. Hardoy, Jorge E., Pre-Columbian Cities, trans. Judith Thorne, Walker, New York, 1964.
  59. Fisher, Leonard Everett, Calendar Art, Four Winds Press, New York, 1987.
  60. Thompson, J. Eric S., Maya Hieroglyphs Without Tears, Trustees of the British Museum, British Museum Publications Limited, London, 1972.
  61. Brotherston, Gordon, Image of the New World, Thames and Hudson, London, 1979.
  62. Gates, William E., An Outline Dictionary of Maya Glyphs, Dover, New York, 1978.
    1. Gates, William E., An Outline Dictionary of Maya Glyphs, Johns Hopkins Press, 1931, pp. 1-174.
    2. Gates, William E., “Glyph Studies,” from The Maya Society Quarterly, Vol. 1, no. 4, September, 1932, pp. 175-204.
  63. Thompson, J. Eric S., Maya Hieroglyphic Writing: An Introduction, Third edition, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1971 (first edition 1950).
  64. Thompson, J. Eric S., A Catalog of Maya Hieroglyphs, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1962.
  65. Murphy, Pat, The Falling Woman, TOR, New York, 1986.
  66. Jennings, Jesse D., and Edward Norbeck, eds., Prehistoric Man in the New World, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1964.
    1. Croneis, Carey, “Geoanthropology,” p. 13.
    2. Krieger, Alex D., “Early Man in the New World,” p. 23.
    3. Collins, Henry B., “The Arctic and Subarctic,” p. 85.
    4. Heizer, Robert F., “The Western Coast of North America,” p. 117.
    5. Jennings, Jesse D., “The Desert West,” p. 149.
    6. Reed, Erik K., “The Greater Southwest,” p. 175.
    7. Wedel, Waldo R., “The Great Plains,” p. 193.
    8. Griffin, James B., “The Northeast Woodlands Area,” p. 223.
    9. Sears, William H., “The Southeastern United States,” p. 259.
    10. Armillas, Pedro, “Northern Mesoamerica,” p. 291.
    11. Wauchope, Robert, “Southern Mesoamerica,” p. 331.
    12. Rouse, Irving, “The Caribbean Area,” p. 389.
    13. Evans, Clifford, “Lowland South America,” p. 419.
    14. Kidder, Alfred II, “South American High Cultures,” p. 451.
    15. Ekholm, Gordon F., “Transpacific Contacts,” p. 489.
    16. Meggers, Betty J., “North and South American Cultural Connections and Convergences,” p. 511.
    17. Swadesh, Morris, “Linguistic Overview,” p. 527.
    18. Bernal, Ignacio, “Concluding Remarks,” p. 559.
  67. Aveni, Anthony F., Skywatchers of Ancient Mexico, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1980.
  68. Aveni, Anthony and Steven Lagerfeld, “Time & What We Make of It,” The Wilson Quarterly, XXII, No. 3, Summer 1998, p. 43.
  69. Aveni, Anthony F., ed., The Sky in Mayan Literature, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1992.
    1. Aveni, Anthony F., “Introduction: Making Time,” p. 3.
    2. Tedlock Barbara, “The Road of Light: Theory and Practice of Mayan Skywatching,” p. 18.
    3. Bricker, Victoria R. and Harvey M. Bricker, “A Method for Cross-Dating Almanacs with Tables in the Dresden Codex,” p. 43.
    4. Aveni, Anthony F., “The Moon and the Venus Table: An Example of Commensuration in the Maya Calendar,” p. 87.
    5. Hofling, Charles A. and Thomas O’Neil, “Eclipse Cycles in the Moon Goddess Almanacs in the Dresden Codex,” p. 102.
    6. Closs, Michael P., “Some Parallels in the Astronomical Events Recorded in the Maya Codices and Inscriptions,” p. 133.
    7. Bricker, Harvey M. and Victoria R. Bricker, “Zodiacal References in the Maya Codices,” p. 148.
    8. Lounsbury, Floyd G., “A Derivation of the Mayan-to-Julian Calendar Correlation from the Dresden Codex Venus Chronology,” p. 184.
    9. Lounsbury, Floyd G., “A Solution for the Number 1.5.5.0 of the Mayan Venus Table,” p. 207.
    10. Paxton, Merideth, “The Books of Chilam Balam: Astronomical Content and the Paris Codex,” p. 216.
    11. Tedlock, Dennis, “Myth, Math, and the Problem of Correlation in Mayan Books,” p. 247.
    12. Frake, Charles O., “Lessons of the Mayan Sky: A Perspective from Medieval Europe,” p. 274.
  70. Williamson, Ray A., Living the Sky: The Cosmos of the American Indian, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1984.
  71. Hadingham, Evan, Early Man and the Cosmos, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1984.
  72. Gallenkamp, Charles, Maya: The Riddle and Rediscovery of a Lost Civilization, third revised edition, Viking, New York, 1985 (first edition 1959).
  73. Gallenkamp, Charles and Regina Elise Johnson, Maya: Treasures of an Ancient Civilization, Abrams, New York, 1985.
    1. de Rodas, Edna Nunez, “A Message from Guatemala,” p. 15.
    2. Vasquez, Mario, “A Message from Mexico,” p. 16.
    3. Branche, Winnel, “A Message from Belize,” p. 17.
    4. Gallenkamp, Charles, “The Ancient Maya,” p. 20.
    5. Sabloff, Jeremy A., “Ancient Maya Civilization,” p. 34.
    6. Coggins, Clemency C., “Maya Iconography,” p. 47.
    7. Clancy, Flora S., “Maya Sculpture,” p. 58.
    8. Culbert, T. Patrick, “Maya Ceramics,” p. 71.
    9. Harrison, Peter D., “Ancient Maya Architecture,” p. 84.
  74. Whitlock, Ralph, Everyday Life of the Maya, Dorset Press, New York, 1976.
  75. Hay, Clarence L., Ralph L. Linton, Samuel K. Lothrop, Harry L. Shapiro and George C. Vaillant, eds., The Maya and Their Neighbors: Essays on Middle American Anthropology and Archaeology, D. Appleton-Century Co., Inc., New York, 1940 (Dover reprint).
    1. Howells, W. W., “The Origins of American Indian Race Types,” p. 3.
    2. Ricketson, Oliver G., “An Outline of Basic Physical Factors Affecting Middle America,” p. 10.
    3. Linton, Ralph, “Crops, Soils and Culture in America,” p. 32.
    4. Kluckhohn, Clyde, “The Conceptual Structure in Middle American Studies,” p. 41.
    5. Mason, J. Alden, “The Native Languages of Middle America,” p. 52.
    6. Johnson, Frederick, “The Linguistic Map of Mexico and Central America,” p. 88.
    7. Kidder, A. V., “Archaeological Problems of the Highland Maya,” p. 117.
    8. Thompson, J. Eric S., “Archaeological Problems of the Lowland Maya,” p. 126.
    9. Morley, Sylvanus Griswold, “Maya Epigraphy,” p. 139.
    10. Andrews, E. Wyllys, “Chronology and Astronomy in the Maya Area,” p. 150.
    11. Spinden, Herbert J., “Diffusion of Maya Astronomy,” p. 162.
    12. Pollock, H. E. D., “Sources and Methods in the Study of Maya Architecture,” p. 179.
    13. Smith, A. Ledyard, “The Corbeled Arch in the New World,” p. 202.
    14. Rupper, Karl, “A Special Assemblage of Maya Structures,” p. 222.
    15. Wauchope, Robert, “Domestic Architecture of the Maya,” p. 232.
    16. Smith, Robert E., “Ceramics of the Peten,” p. 242.
    17. Butler, Mary, “A Pottery Sequence from the Alta Verapaz, Guatemala,” p. 250.
    18. Longyear, John M., “The Ethnological Significance of Copan Pottery,” p. 268.
    19. Hooton, Earnest A., “Skeletons from the Cenote of Sacrifice at Chichen Itza,” p. 272.
    20. La Farge, Oliver, “Maya Ethnology: The Sequence of Cultures,” p. 281.
    21. Vaillant, George C., “Patterns in Middle American Archaeology,” p. 295.
    22. Noguera, Eduardo, “Excavations at Tehuacan,” p. 306.
    23. Ekholm, Gordon F., “The Archaeology of Northern and Western Mexico,” p. 320.
    24. Roberts, Frank H. H. Jr., “Pre-pottery Horizon of the Anasazi and Mexico,” p. 331.
    25. Brew, J. O., “Mexican Influence upon the Indian Cultures of the Southwestern United States in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries,” p. 341.
    26. Phillips, Philip, “Middle American Influences on the Archaeology of the Southeastern United States,” p. 349.
    27. Guthe, Carl E., “Sequence of Culture in the Eastern United States,” p. 368.
    28. Strong, Wm. Duncan, “Anthropological Problems in Central America,” p. 377.
    29. Stone, Doris, “The Ulua Valley and Lake Yojoa,” p. 386.
    30. Richardson, Francis B., “Non-Maya Monumental Sculpture of Central America,” p. 395.
    31. Lothrop, Samuel K., “South America as Seen from Middle America,” p. 417.
    32. Means, Philip Ainsworth, “The Philosophic Interrelationship between Middle American and Andean Religions,” p. 430.
    33. Kidder, Alfred II, “South American Penetrations in Middle America,” p. 441.
    34. Kroeber, A. L., “Conclusions: The Present Status of Americanistic Problems,” p. 460.
  76. Erdoes, Richard, and Alfonso Ortiz, American Indian Myths and Legends, Pantheon, New York, 1984.
  77. Wright, Ronald, Time Among the Maya, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, New York, 1989.
  78. Whitrow, G. J., Time in History, Oxford University Press, Oxford, New York, 1988.
  79. Kendall, Aubyn, The Art and Archaeology of Pre-Columbian Middle America: An Annotated Bibliography of Works in English, G. K. Hall, New York, 1977.
  80. Hunter, C. Bruce, A Guide to Ancient Maya Ruins, University of Oklahoma, Norman, 1974.
  81. Hunter, C. Bruce, A Guide to Ancient Maya Ruins: Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged, University of Oklahoma, Norman, 1986 (first edition 1974).
  82. Highwater, Jamake, Arts of the Indian Americas, Harper and Row, New York, 1983.
  83. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy Bulletin, Volume I, no. 1, November 1977.
  84. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy Bulletin, Volume I, no. 2, February 1978.
    1. Williamson, Ray A., “Pueblo Bonito and the Sun,” p. 5.
    2. Benson, Craig J., Cathy A. Leder and Wm. R. Haase, “Ancient Pueblo Astronomy: Changes in Equinox Alignments Over Time,” p. 7.
  85. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy Bulletin, Volume I, no. 3, May 1978.
    1. Carlson, John B., ed., “Sir Norman Lockyer Archaeoastronomy Symposium: Abstracts of Papers Presented,” p. 4.
  86. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy Bulletin, Volume I, no. 4, August 1978.
    1. Feldman, Lawrence A., “A Note on Sixteenth Century Nahua and Yucatec Terms for Stars,” p. 17.
  87. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy Bulletin, Volume II, no. 1, November 1978.
    1. Newton, Robert R., “On a Pedagogical Motivation for Ptolemy’s Fabrication of Data,” p. 7.
    2. Dix, Byron E., “Possible Heliolithic Sites in Vermont,” p. 9.
  88. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of The Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume II, no. 2, Spring 1979.
    1. Autry, Nev. E. and Wanda R. Autry, “Zodiac Ridge: A Possible Pre-Hispanic Native American Observatory,” p. 7.
    2. Carlson, John B., “Archaeoastronomy—The Scope and Implications in Interaction with Other Disciplines,” p. 7.
    3. Gibbs, Sharon L., “Archaeoastronomy and the History of Astronomy,” p. 9.
    4. Reyman, Jonathan E., “Some Observations on Archaeology and Archaeoastronomy,” p. 11.
    5. Chang, Y. C., “The Tendency in Orbital Evolution of Halley’s Comet and Its Ancient History,” p. 15.
    6. Opperman, Renee G., “Research at Casa Grande,” p. 16.
    7. Riese, Berthold, “Dictionaries as Sources of Ethno-Astronomical Data,” p. 16.
  89. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of The Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume II, no. 3, Summer 1979.
    1. Morris, Walter F., “The Chiapas Maya Weavers’ Vision of the Cosmos,” p. 8.
    2. Williamson, Ray A., “Field Report: Hovenweep National Monument,” p. 11.
    3. Opperman, Renee G., “Research at Casa Grande,” p. 12.
  90. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of The Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume II, no. 4, Fall 1979.
    1. Hostetter, H. Clyde, “A Planetary Visit to Hades,” p. 7.
    2. Vogrin, Annegrete, “The Astronomical Orientation of Stela I at Copan,” p. 10.
    3. Taladoire, Eric, “Orientation of Ball-Courts in Mesoamerica,” p. 12.
    4. McCandless, Brian Eric, “Some Notes on the Cahokia Sun Circle,” p. 14.
    5. Sadowski, Robert M., “Possible Astronomical Orientations at an Ancient East-European ‘Sanctuary’,” p. 17.
    6. Sullivan, William F., “Research Note: Quechua Star Names,” p. 20.
  91. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume III, no. 1, Winter 1980.
    1. Benson, Ariene, “California Sun-Watching Site,” p. 16.
    2. Farrer, Claire R., “Mescalero Apaches and Ethnoastronomy,” p. 20.
    3. Zeilik, Michael, “Pecked-Cross-Like Petroglyphs in New Mexico,” p. 21.
    4. Woodside, Joseph H., “Amahuaca Observational Astronomy,” p. 22.
    5. Dix, Byron E., James W. Mavor, Jr. and June W. Potts, “Progress Report on the Calendar 1 Area in Central Vermont,” p. 27.
    6. Frank, Roslyn M., “Basque Stone Circles and Geometry,” p. 28.
  92. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume III, no. 2, April-June 1980.
    1. Sakuri, Kunitomo, “Ancient Solar Observatory in Asuka, Japan,” p. 14.
    2. Morgan, Thomas E., “The Burmese Era and Ancient Astronomy in Southeast Asia,” p. 20.
    3. Ziolkowski, Mariusz S. and Robert M. Sadowski, “The Astronomical Data in Fernando Montesinos’ Peruvian Chronicle: The Comets of Chapaq Yupanki,” p. 22.
    4. Mansfield, Victor H., “The Big Horn Medicine Wheel as a Site for the Vision Quest,” p. 26
    5. Hostetter, H. Clyde, “A 56-Year Eclipse Prediction System,” p. 29.
  93. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume III, no. 3, July-August-September 1980.
    1. Harper, Katherine H., “Archaeoastronomy Seminar,” p. 5.
    2. Aveni, A. and R. T. Zuidema, “Brief Summary of Research Activities in Peru,” p. 7.
    3. Morgan, Thomas E., trans., “Whose Calendar is Older?: An Article from the Soviet Newspaper Nedelya,” p. 8.
    4. Hadingham, Evan, “Carnac Revisited,” p. 10.
    5. Beehler, Carolyn Murphy, “The Priscilla Catacomb Painting: A Hidden Star Map Revealed,” p. 14.
    6. Stewart, Joe D., “On Burmese Calendrics and Astronomy,” p. 17.
    7. Folan, William J. and Antonio Ruiz Perez, “The Diffusion of Astronomical Knowledge in Greater Mesoamerica,” p. 20.
  94. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume III, no. 4, October-November-December 1980.
    1. Robinson, Jack H., “Fomalhaut and Cairn D at the Big Horn and Moose Mountain Medicine Wheels,” p. 15.
    2. Fries, Allan G., “Vision Quests at the Big Horn Medicine Wheel and Its Date of Construction,” p. 20.
    3. Roslund, Curt, “Orientation and Geometry of Ale’s Stones,” p. 25.
    4. Barlia, Katalin, “On the Orientation of Graves in Prehistoric Cemetaries,” p. 29.
    5. Gaustad, John E., “The Chaco Canyon Supernova Pictograph: A Reorientation,” p. 33
  95. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume IV, no. 1, January-March 1981.
    1. Agius, George and Frank Ventura, “Investigation into the Possible Astronomical Alignments of the Copper Age Temples in Malta,” p. 10.
    2. Angerhofer, P. E., “CTB 80: Evidence for a Ninth Historical Supernova?” p. 22.
    3. Sivin, Nathan, “Some Important Publications on Early Chinese Astronomy from China and Japan, 1978-1980,” p. 26.
  96. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume IV, no. 2, April-June 1981.
    1. White, Raymond E., “The Earthwatch/University of Arizona Field Expedition to Machu Picchu,” p. 3.
    2. Gingerich, Owen, “The New York Academy of Sciences Conference: Ethnoastronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the American Tropics,” p. 5.
    3. Pitts, Michael W., “The Discovery of a New Stone at Stonehenge,” p. 16.
    4. Anderson, Neal S., “The Solar Observatory at Xochicalco and the Maya Farmer’s Almanac,” p. 22.
    5. Schlak, Arthur, “The Las Bocas Pectoral and the Venus Count,” p. 27.
  97. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume IV, no. 3, July-September 1981.
    1. Robinson, Jack H., “Astronomical Alignments at the Fort Smith Medicine Wheel,” p. 14.
    2. Stocker, Terry, “A Note on Eastern U. S. Site Orientations,” p. 24.
    3. Anderson, Neal S. and Moises Morales, “Solstitial Alignments of the Temple of the Inscriptions at Palenque,” p. 30.
    4. Anderson, Neal S., Moises Morales and Alfonso Morales, “A Solar Alignment of the Palace Tower at Palenque,” p. 34.
  98. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume IV, no. 4, October-December 1981.
    1. Umberger, Emily, “The Structure of Aztec History,” p. 10.
    2. Burl, Aubrey, “Holes in the Argument,” p. 19.
    3. Roberts, Allen F., “Passage Stellified: Speculation Upon Archaeoastronomy in Southeastern Zaire,” p. 26.
    4. Closs, Michael P., “Venus Dates Revisited,” p. 38.
  99. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume V, no. 1, January-March 1982.
    1. Krupp, E. C., “The ‘Binding of the Years,’ The Pleiades, and the Nadir Sun,” p. 9
    2. Reyman, Jonathan E., “A Deposit from Pueblo Bonito Having Possible Astronomical Significance,” p. 14.
    3. Reese, Ronald Lane, Steven M. Everett and Edwin D. Craun, “ ‘In the Beginning.’: The Ussher Chronology and Other Renaissance Ideas Dating the Creation,” p. 20.
    4. Frank, Roslyn M., “The Basque League and Terrestrial Geometry,” p. 24.
  100. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume V, no. 2, April-June 1982.
    1. Olsen, John W., “Libyan Desert Glas and the Prehistory of the Great Sand Sea,” p. 11.
    2. Bausani, Alessandro, “The Prehistoric Basque Week of Three Days,” p. 16.
    3. Magana, Edmundo, “A Comparison between Carib, Tukano/Cubeo and Western Astronomy,” p. 23.
  101. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume V, no. 3, July-September 1982.
    1. Pankenier, David W., “Early Chinese Positional Astronomy: The Guoyu Astronomical Record,” p. 10.
    2. Aveni, A. F. and H. Hartung, “Note on the Discovery of Two New Pecked Cross Petroglyphs,” p. 21.
    3. Bracher, Katherine, “Solar Eclipse Tracks of Possible Archaeological Interest,” p. 24.
  102. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Bulletin of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume V, no. 4, October-December 1982.
    1. James, Cary, “Joshua’s ‘Standing Sun’ at Gibeon: Biblical Archaeoastronomy?” p. 10.
    2. Urton, Gary, “Report on Fieldwork in Pacariqtambo, Peru,” p. 20.
    3. Iwaniszewski, Stanislaw, “New Pecked Cross Designs Discovered at Teotihuacan,” p. 22.
  103. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Journal of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume VI, nos. 1-4, January-December 1983.
    1. Chamberlain, Von Del, “Navajo Constellations in Literature, Art, Artifact and a New Mexico Rock Art Site,” p. 48.
    2. Williamson, Ray A., “Sky Symbolism in a Navajo Rock Art Site, Chaco Canyon,” p. 59.
    3. Zeilik, Michael and Richard Elston, “Wijiji at Chaco Canyon: A Winter Solstice Sunrise and Sunset Station,” p. 66.
    4. Robertson, Thomas H., “The Reliability of Historical Maps of Earthworks in the Ohio Valley,” p. 74.
    5. Ray, Roger B., “A Malecite Calendar of the Pre-Contact Period,” p. 80.
    6. Hall, Roberta L. and Robert D. Hall, “A Possible Aboriginal Winter Solstice Viewing Site on the Southern Oregon Coast,” p. 86.
    7. Jansen, Maarten E. R. G. N. and G. Aurora Perez, “The Ancient Mexican Astronomical Apparatus: An Iconographical Criticism,” p. 89.
    8. Mayer, Karl Herbert, “A Painted Venus Glyph in the Tower at Palenque,” p. 96.
    9. Schaefer, Bradley E., “Chinese ‘Astronomical’ Jade Disks: The Pi,” p. 99.
    10. Magana, Edmundo and Fabiola Jara, “Invention of the Sky,” p. 102.
    11. Herberger, Charles F., “The Mallia Table: Kernos or Clock?,” p. 114.
    12. Roughton, N. A., “A Computer Study of Babylonian Almanacs,” p. 118.
    13. Robinson, Jack H., “The Solstice Eclipses of Stonehenge II,” p. 124.
    14. Atkinson, R. J. C., “Stonehenge: The Aubrey Holes and the Avenue,” p. 132.
    15. Seitel, Peter, “Cultural Implications of the Eclipse of 16 February 1980 in Lamu, Kenya,” p. 134.
  104. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Journal of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume VII, nos. 1-4, January-December 1984.
    1. Zezong, Xi, “New Archaeoastronomical Discoveries in China,” p. 34.
    2. Wicke, Charles R., “The Mesoamerican Rabbit in the Moon: An Influence from Han China?” p. 46.
    3. Tuman, V. S., “The Tomb of Antiochus Revisited: Planetary Alignments and the Deification of the King,” p. 56.
    4. Zeilik, Michael, “A Possible Equinoctial Sun-Sighting Station at Tsiping, New Mexico,” p. 70.
    5. Zeilik, Michael, “Summer Solstice at Casa Rinconada: Calendar, Hierophany, or Nothing?” p. 76.
    6. Murray, William Breen, “Numerical Characteristics of Three Engraved Bison Scapulae from the Texas Gulf Coast,” p. 82.
    7. Chadwick, Robert, “The Origins of Astronomy and Astrology in Mesopotamia,” p. 89.
    8. Dearborn, David S. P., “New Tools for Ancient Skies,” p. 96.
    9. Ouzounian, Joseph G., “Armenian Astronomy in the Bronze Age,” p. 105,
    10. Robiou-Lamarche, Sabastian, “Astronomy in Taino Mythology,” p. 110.
  105. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Journal of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume VIII, nos. 1-4, January-December 1985.
    1. MacKie, E. W., P. G. Gladwin and A. E. Roy, “Brainport Bay: A Prehistoric Calendrical Site in Argyllshire, Scotland,” p. 53.
    2. Hicks, Ronald, “Astronomical Traditions of Ancient Ireland and Britain,” p. 70.
    3. Tedlock, Barbara, “Hawks, Meteorology and Astronomy in Quiche-Maya Agriculture,” p. 80.
    4. Walker, Merle F., “The Juniper Cave Summer Solstice Pictograph,” p. 90.
    5. Conway, Thor, “Halley’s Comet Legends Among the Great Lakes Ojibwa Indians,” p. 98.
    6. Hedberg, Bjorn, “Dominant Traditions in Swedish Comet Lore,” p. 106.
    7. Saad-Cook, Janet, “Touching the Sky: Conversations with Four Contemporary Artists,” p. 118.
  106. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Journal of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume IX, nos. 1-4, Jan.-Dec. 1986.
    1. Dearborn, David S. P., and Katharina Schreiber, “Here Comes the Sun: The Cuzco-Machu Picchu Connection,” p. 15.
    2. Duarte, Julio D., and William Liller, “Easter Island’s ‘Solar Ranging Device,’ Ahu Huri A Urenga, and Vicinity,” p. 38.
    3. Liller, William, “Celestial Happenings on Easter Island: A. D. 760-837,” p. 52.
    4. Farrer, Claire R., “Mescalero Apache Terminology for Venus,” p. 59.
    5. Griffin-Pierce, Trudy, “Ethnoastronomy in Navajo Sandpaintings of the Heavens,” p. 62.
    6. Malville, J. McKim, and Mark Neupert, “Organization of Space in the Anasazi Ceremonial Site of Yellow Jacket, 5MT-5,” p. 70.
    7. Barrie, Roberto, “The Ixtaplaluca Archaeological Monument,” p. 77.
    8. Zeilik, Michael, “Keeping a Seasonal Calendar at Pueblo Bonito,” p. 79.
    9. Sharma, Virendra Nath, “Model of Planetary Configuration in the Mahabharata: An Exercise in Archaeoastronomy,” p. 88.
    10. Smither, Robert K., “The 88 Lunar Month Pattern of Solar and Lunar Eclipses and its Relationship to the Maya Calendar,” p. 99.
  107. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Journal of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume X, 1987-1988.
    1. Blier, Suzanne Preston, “Imagines Mundi: Narrative, Ritual, and Architectural Exemplars of Batammaliba Cosmology,” p. 36.
    2. Roberts, Allen F., “Rock Music and the Zaose Solar Deity,” p. 54.
    3. Schlegel, Stuart A., “The Traditional Tiruray Zodiac: The Celestial Calendar of a Phillippine Swidden and Foraging People,” p. 61.
    4. Williamson, Ray A. and Carol Ambruster, “Astronomical Alignments at Cajon Mesa Ruins, Hovenweep National Monument: An Update,” p. 70.
    5. Leonard, Kenneth C., “Calendric Keystone(?): The Skidi Pawnee Chart of the Heavens: A New Interpretation,” p. 76.
    6. Sprajc, Ivan, “Venus and Temple 22 at Copan: Revisted,” p. 88.
    7. Trenary, Carlos, “Universal Meteor Metaphors and Their Occurrence in Mesoamerican Astronomy,” p. 98.
    8. Levendosky, Ixchel, “The Influence of the Skies on Plains Indian Vision Quests and Shields,” p. 117.
    9. Tuman, Vladimir S. and Robert Hoffman, “Rediscovering the Past: Application of Computers to the Astronomical Dating of Kudurru SB22 at the Louvre Museum,” p. 124.
    10. Meluzin, Sylvia, “An Ancient Zapotec Calendrical Cosmogram,” p. 139.
  108. Carlson, John B., ed., Archaeoastronomy: The Journal of the Center for Archaeoastronomy, Volume XI, 1989-1993.
    1. Winkler, Johs., “The Calendar of the Toba-Batak of Sumatra,” p. 20.
    2. Kimball, Linda Amy, “The Batak Porhalaan Traditional Calendar of Sumatra,” p. 28.
    3. Farrer, Claire R., Gene Ammarell and Bernard Second, “Mescalero Apache Ethnoastronomy: Problems and Praxis,” p. 57.
    4. Malville, J. McKim and Kenneth R. Brownsberger, “Ceremonial Features of Yellow Jacket, 5MT-5,” p. 64.
    5. Schaefer, Bradley E., “Astronomy and the Limits of Vision,” p. 78.
    6. Schaefer, Bradley E., “Confluences of Astronomical Spectacles,” p. 91.
    7. Ahmad, Imad A., “Did Muhammad Observe the Canterbury Meteoroid Swarm?,” p. 95.
    8. Ahmad, Imad A., “The Dawn Sky on Lailat-ul-qadr (The Night of Power),” p. 97.
    9. Hall, Robert L., “The Historical Identity of a Mass Conjunction Inferred from the Madrid Codex,” p. 101.
    10. Saul, J., “ ‘As It Is Above, So Shall It Be Below’: The Blueprint of Civilization,” p. 104.
    11. Aveni, Anthony F., Michael Closs and Horst Hartung, “At the Crossroads of Astronomy and Archaeology: An Appraisal of Baudez’ Appraisal of Archaeoastronomy at Copan (and Elsewhere),” p. 108.
  109. Landes, David S., Revolution in Time, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1983.
  110. Leonard, Jonathan Norton, Ancient America, Time-Life, New York, 1967.
  111. Spinden, Herbert J., Ancient Civilizations of Mexico and Central America, Handbook Series No. 3, American Museum of Natural History, New York, 1928.
  112. Spinden, Herbert J., A Study of Maya Art: Its Subject Matter & Historical Development, Dover, New York, 1975. (Original publication 1913; With a New Introduction & Bibliography by J. Eric S. Thompson.)
  113. Gerlach, Nancy and Jeffrey Gerlach, Foods of the Maya: A Taste of the Yucatan, The Crossing Press, Freedom CA, 1994.
  114. Thompson, J. Eric, “Sky Bearers, Colors and Directions in Maya and Mexican Religion,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume II, No. 10, August 30, 1934.
  115. Thompson, J. Eric, “Maya Chronology: The Fifteen Tun Glyph,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume II, No. 11, August 30, 1934.
  116. Teeple, John E., “Maya Astronomy: Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume I, No. 1, November 1931.
  117. Teeple, John E., “Maya Inscriptions: Glyphs C, D, and E of the Supplementary Series,” American Anthropologist n.s. 27, 1925, 108-115.
  118. Teeple, John E., “Maya Inscriptions: Further Notes on the Supplementary Series, American Anthropologist n.s. 27, 1925, 544-549.
  119. Teeple, John E., “Maya Inscriptions VI: The Lunar Calendar and its Relation to Maya History,” American Anthropologist n.s. 30, 1928, 391-407.
  120. Ricketson, Oliver Jr., “Notes on Two Maya Astronomic Observatories,” American Anthropologist n.s. 30, 1928, 434-444.
  121. Smith, A. Ledyard and Sylvanus G. Morley, “Two Recent Ceramic Finds at Uaxactun,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume II, No. 5, September 1932.
  122. Thompson, J. Eric S., “Maya Arithmetic,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume VII, No. 36, March 1, 1941.
  123. Lincoln, J. Steward, “The Maya Calendar of the Ixil of Guatemala,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume VII, No. 38, February, 1942.
  124. Makemson, Maud Worcester, “The Astronomical Tables of the Maya,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume VIII, No. 42, August, 1943.
  125. Thompson, J. Eric S., “The Initial Series of Stela 14, Piedras Negras, Guatemala, and a Date on Stela 19, Naranjo, Guatemala,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 18, March 30, 1943.
  126. Thompson, J. Eric S., “The Introduction of Puuc Style of Dating at Yaxchilan,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 110, May 15, 1952.
  127. Thompson, J. Eric S., “A Stela at San Lorenzo, Southeaster Campeche,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 115, June, 1953.
  128. Prouskouriakoff, Tatiana, “The Survival of the Maya Tun Count in Colonial Times,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 112, October 20, 1952.
  129. Thompson, J. Eric S., “Observations of Glyph G of the Lunar Series,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 7, July 25, 1942.
  130. Thompson, J. Eric S., “Maya Epigraphy: Directional Glyphs in Counting,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 20, May 1, 1943.
  131. Thompson, J. Eric S., “Maya Epigraphy: A Cycle of 819 Days,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 22, October 30, 1943.
  132. Thompson, J. Eric S., “The Dating of Structure 44, Yaxchilan, and its Bearing on the Sequence of Texts at that Site,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 71, October 5, 1946.
  133. Prouskouriakoff, Tatiana and J. Eric S. Thompson, “Maya Calendar Round Dates Such as 9 Ahau 17 Mol,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 79, January 27, 1947.
  134. Roys, Ralph L., “The Book of Chilam Balam of Ixil,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 75, December 18, 1946.
  135. Roys, Ralph L., The Book of Chilam Balam of Chumayel, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1967 (First Edition published 1933).
  136. Fulton, Charles C., “Elements of Maya Arithmetic with Particular Attention to the Calendar,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 85, November 24, 1947.
  137. Fulton, Charles C., “Did the Maya have a Zero? The Meanings of our Zero and the Maya ‘Zero’ Symbols,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 90, April 8, 1948.
  138. Berlin, Heinrich, “Notes on Glyph C of the Lunar Series at Palenque,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 24, November 10, 1943.
  139. Satterthwaite, Linton Jr., “New Photographs and the Date of Stela 14, Piedras Negras,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 28, November 22, 1943.
  140. Long, R. C. E., “A Note on Aztec Chronology,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 11, December 20, 1942.
  141. Long, Richard C. E., “Observation of the Sun among the Ixil of Guatemala,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 87, February 20, 1948.
  142. Long, Richard C. E., “Some Remarks on Maya Arithmetic,” Notes on Middle American Archaeology and Ethnology No. 88, March 31, 1948.
  143. Beyer, Hermann, “Studies on the Inscriptions of Chichen Itza,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume IV, No. 21, June, 1937.
  144. Thompson, J. Eric, “A New Method of Deciphering Yucatecan Dates with Special Reference to Chichen Itza,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume IV, No. 22, June, 1937.
  145. Magee, Susan Fortson, Mesoamerican Archaeology: A Guide to the Literature and Other Information Sources, University of Texas, Austin, 1981.
  146. Kelley, David H., “Eurasian Evidence and the Mayan Calendar Correlation Problem,” Mesoamerican Archaeology ??.
  147. Gossen, Gary H., “A Chamula Solar Calendar Board from Chiapas, Mexico,” Mesoamerican Archaeology ??.
  148. Marshack, Alexander, “The Chamula Calendar Board: An Internal and Comparative Analysis,” Mesoamerican Archaeology ??.
  149. Digby, Adrian, “Crossed Trapezes: A Pre-Columbian Astronomical Instrument,” Mesoamerican Archaeology ??.
  150. Winzerling, E. O., Aspects of the Maya Culture, The North River Press, New York, 1956.
  151. Knorozov, Yuri, Maya Hieroglyphic Codices Translated from the Russian by Sophie D. Coe, Institute for Mesoamerican Studies, State University of New York at Albany, Publication No. 8, 1982 (to page 37).
  152. Knorozov, Yuri V., “Ancient Writing of Central America,” Maya File 116.
  153. Leon-Portilla, Miguel, Time and Reality in the Thought of the Maya, Beacon Press, Boston, 1968.
  154. Leon-Portilla, Miguel, Time and Reality in the Thought of the Maya: Second Edition, Enlarged, With a Foreword by Sir J. Eric S. Thompson and an Appendix by Alfonso Villa Rojas, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1988.
  155. Zerubavel, Eviatar, Hidden Rhythms: Schedules and Calendars in Social Life, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1981.
  156. Zerubavel, Eviatar, The Seven Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1985.
  157. Morley, Sylvanus, In Search of Maya Glyphs: From the Archaeological Journals of Sylvanus G. Morley, Edited and with an Introduction by Robert H. Lister and Florence C. Lister, Museum of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe, 1970.
  158. Hopkins, Nicholas A. and J. Kathryn Josserand, “Notes on Chol Grammar,” Maya File 83; Maya File 1999.67.
  159. Hopkins, Nicholas A., “Cholan as Western Mayan with a Yucatecan Substratum,” Maya File 84; Maya File 1999.64.
  160. Hopkins, Nicholas A., “Knowledge and Use of Dialect Variants in Lowland Chol,” Maya File 85; Maya File 1999.65.
  161. Hopkins, Nicholas A., “Positionals in Chol (Mayan),” Maya File 86; Maya File 1999.66.
  162. Josserand, J. Kathryn and Nicholas A. Hopkins, “Chol Grammar Notes: Charts and Formulas,” Maya File 102; Maya File 1999.89.
  163. Josserand, J. K. and Linda Schele, “Discourse Analysis of Narrative Hieroglyphic Texts,” Maya File 104; Maya File 1999.88.
  164. Josserand, J. K., “Archaeological and Linguistic Correlations for Mayan Prehistory,” Maya File 105; Maya File 1999.87.
  165. Josserand, J. Kathryn, “Participant Tracking in Maya Hieroglyphic Texts:  Who was That Masked Man?”  Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 5(1), 1995:  65-89.
  166. Houston, Stephen, “Origins of Classic Mayan Passives,” Handout for 1999 Short Workshop.
  167. Andrews, E. Wyllys V, “Olmec Jades and Early Maya Pottery,” Maya File 1999.13.
  168. Kelley, David H., “Phoneticism in the Maya Script,” Maya File 113.
  169. Lounsbury, F. G., “The Base of the Venus Table of the Dresden Codex, and Its Significance for the Calendar-Correlation Problem,” Maya File 123, Maya File 316h.
  170. Lounsbury, F. G., “Formulae for Maya Calendrical Computations,” Maya File 124.
  171. MacLeod, Barbara, “The Primary Standard Sequence: A Brief History of Decipherment and Outline of the Scribal Database,” Maya File 128.
  172. MacLeod, Barbara, “Passives and Antipassives in the Maya Writing System,” Maya File 127.
  173. Schele, Linda and David A. Freidel, “The Courts of Creation: Ballcourts, Ballgames, and Portals to the Maya Otherworld,” Maya File 174.
  174. Tedlock, Barbara, “Earth Rites and Moon Cycles: Mayan Synodic and Sidereal Lunar Reckoning,” Maya File 231.
  175. Tedlock, Barbara, Time and the Highland Maya, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1982.
  176. Tedlock, Dennis, “The Sowing and Dawning of All the Sky-Earth: Astronomy in the Popol Vuh,” Maya File 233.
  177. Tedlock, Dennis, “Hearing a Voice in an Ancient Text,” Maya File 232.
  178. Schele, Linda and Peter Matthews, “Distance Numbers: Roadmaps of Time,” Unpublished Chapter IX of Maya Writing Book, Maya File 210.
  179. Schele, Linda and Peter Matthews, “The Mayan Languages and the Writing System
    The Linguistic Basis of Maya Hieroglyphic Writing
    The History of Maya Languages,” Unpublished Chapters IV, IV-A and IV-A1 of Maya Writing Book, Maya File 211.
  180. Schele, Linda and Peter Matthews, “Numbers,” Unpublished Chapter III of Maya Writing Book, Maya File 212.
  181. Schele, Linda and Peter Matthews, “Period-Endings, Anniversaires, and Distance Numbers Precision without the Long Count Date,” Unpublished Chapters X and X-A of Maya Writing Book, Maya File 213.
  182. Schele, Linda and Peter Matthews, “Titles, Epithets, and Other Personal Designations,” Unpublished Chapter IX (sic) of Maya Writing Book, Maya File 214.
  183. Davoust, Michel, “Les Premiers Chefs Mayas de Chichen Itza” and “Etude des Glyphes de Filiation,” Maya File 68 (1977).
  184. Davoust, Michel, “Les Principaux Textes Epigraphiques de Yaxchilan: Transcription, Transliteration, Traduction,” Maya File 69 (1990).
  185. Davoust, Michel, Un Nouveau Commentaire du Codex de Dresde: Codex Hiéroglyphic Maya du XIVe Siècle, CNRS Editions, Paris, 1997.
  186. Davoust, Michel, L’Écriture Maya: et Son Déchiffrement, CNRS Editions, Paris, 1995.
  187. Looper, Matt, “Quirigua Inscriptions,” Maya File 92.
  188. Anderson, Lloyd, “Parallels between the Japanese Kojiki, the Navajo ‘Where the Two Came to Their Father’, and the Quiche Popol Vuh,” Maya File 283 (1992).
  189. Anderson, Lloyd B., “Visual Arrangements for Linguistic Data and Narrative Text,” Maya File 7.
  190. Anderson, Lloyd B., “Palenque Cross-Group Text Arrangements: Questions of Discourse Structure,” Maya File 5.
  191. Anderson, Lloyd B., “Sentence Structures in the Dresden Codex: A Very Preliminary Finder-Listing,” Maya File 6.
  192. Anderson, Lloyd B., ““Cajal” vs. “The Caj of” (The Higher Lord): A Brief Note on Suffixation and English Translations,” Maya File 3.
  193. Aguilar, Manuel, “Nahualism and Ethnomedicine in Mesoamerica,” Maya File 322.
  194. Aguilar-Moreno, Manuel, “The Olmec “Humboldt Axe” and the Aztec Atl-Tlachinolli Symbol,” Maya File 327.
  195. Ambrosino, James, “Katun History in the Classic Maya Lowlands: Evidence and Implications,” Maya File 282.
  196. Wald, Robert Francis, Transitive Verb Inflection in Classic Maya Hieroglyphic Texts: Its Implications for Decipherment and Historical Linguistics, Master’s Thesis, University of Texas at Austin, Maya File 287.
  197. Gossen, Gary H., “Who is the Comandante of Subcomandante Marcos?” Maya File 297.
  198. Zapatista, Accion, “Women in War and the War Against Women,” Maya File 298.
  199. Josserand, J. Kathryn and Nicholas A. Hopkins, “Chol Ritual Language,” Maya File 307 (1996); Maya File 1999.90.
  200. MacLeod, Barbara, “The Affix T174 as Kuch ‘Seat, Carry, (Storage) Place’,” Maya File 308 (1993).
  201. Lacadena, Alfonso, “A New Proposal for the Transcription of the A-k’u-na/A-k’u-HUN-na Title,” Maya File 309 (1996).
  202. Lacadena, Alfonso, “Passive Voice in Classic Mayan Texts: [h]C-ah and -n-ah Constructions,” Maya File 310 (1996).
  203. Lacadena, Alfonso, “Ch’/Ka’, Yax and Wi’il: Three Examples of Adverbial Use of Adjectives in Classic Maya Inscriptions,” Maya File 311.
  204. Boot, Erik, “Kan Ek’ at Chich’en Itsa: A Quest into a Possible Itsa Heartland in the Central Peten, Guatemala,” Maya File 313.
  205. Boot, Erik, “Recent Epigraphic Research on the Inscriptions at Chich’en Itsa, Yucatan, Mexico,” Maya File 314.
  206. Boot, Erik, “Classic Maya Vessel Classification: Rare Vessel Type Collocations Containing the Noun Cheb “Quill”,” Maya File 354.
  207. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 1:  T24 as Il and Tsuk“ (February 3, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  208. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 2:  T759 as Lo:  Further Evidence” (February 4, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  209. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 3:  Notes on Starwars” (February 4, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  210. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 4:  Patrons & Protectors” (February 4, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  211. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 5:  Notes on the ‘Bak’tun’ and ‘K’atun’ Period as Kan’’ (February 11, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  212. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 6:  More on T24 as Il” (February 6, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  213. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 7:  Odd Combinations of Numeral Coefficients at Xcalumkin, Campeche” (February 12, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  214. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 8:  The Collocation Kan K’ul at Chich’en Itsa, Yucatan” (February 12, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  215. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 9:  The Nun from K’ak’nal:  Ritual Speech from the Place of Fire at Chich’en Itsa” (February 12, 1997), Maya File 1999.28.
  216. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 10: On the Bate Collocations,” Maya File 355.
  217. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 11: A Female Companion for K’ak’upakal?,” Maya File 355.
  218. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 12: A New Naranjo Area Toponym: Yots,” Maya File 355.
  219. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 13: A North Yucatecan Origin for Kerr #4333?,” Maya File 355.
  220. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 14: Rare Vessel Type Collocations Containing the Noun Che’b,” Maya File 355.
  221. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 15: On the Verbal Expression Bak-,” Maya File 355.
  222. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 16: Win: A Reflection on the ”Mirror“ Sign,” Maya File 355.
  223. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 17: Year-Bearers and Tun Ahaw:  Two Objects from the Cenote of Sacrifice at Chich’en Itsa, Yucatan, Mexico,” Maya File 1999.supp. 10.
  224. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 18: Long Vowel Rendering and Verbal Inflection:  A Contrast in -AH and -A:H (-AAH),” Maya File 1999.supp 11.
  225. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 19: Dzilam Stela 1 Revisited:  A New Reading of its Front Text,” Maya File 1999.supp. 9.
  226. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 20: Some Preliminary Notes on ’Miscellaneous Texts’ on Portable Objects from Dzibilchaltun, Yucatan, Mexico,” Maya File 1999.supp 8.
  227. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 21: Preliminary Notes on T575:713a:  A Case for Logographic K’al and Syllabic Value K’a,” Maya File 1999.supp 7
  228. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 22: Accession Texts of Founders at Tikal and Copan:  A Preliminary Observation Regarding the ’Lord of the Night’,” Maya File 1999.supp 6.
  229. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 23:  A New Verbal Expression:  Wol- ’To Make Round, To Wrap Up’,” Maya File 1999.supp 5.
  230. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 24:  The Classic Maya Paradigm of Power at Chich’en Itsa:  An Accession Phrase for K’ak’u Pakal?”  Maya File 1999.supp 4.
  231. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 25:  Of Serpents and Centipedes:  The Epithet Wuk Chapaht Chan K’inich Ahaw.”  Maya File 1999.supp 3.
  232. Boot, Erik, “Notes on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing 26: Early Maya Hieroglyphic Writing:  An Analysis of Text and Image of a Small Stela in the Ethnographic Museum in Antwerp, Belgium.”  Maya File 1999.supp. 2.
  233. Boot, Erik, “The Yucatec Maya Dance Festival of Fire and the Inscriptions at Chich’en Itsa, Yucatan, Mexico,” Maya File 1999.supp. 1.
  234. Boot, Erik, “Hulom Kukulcan:  ‘The Arrival of K’uk’ulkan’:  The Legitimacy of Itsa Maya Rule and the Mesoamerican Principle of Bestowing the Insignia of Power,” Maya File 1999.supp 12.
  235. Boot, Erik, “Architecture and Identity in the Northern Maya Lowlands:  The ‘Temple of K’uk’ulkan’ at Chich’en Itsa, Yucatan, Mexico,” Maya File 1999.supp 13.
  236. Boot, Erik, “A Maya-English Hieroglyphic Vocabulary,”  Maya File 1999.supp 14.
  237. Boot, Erik, “Short Notes on the Inscriptions and Iconography of Chich’en Itsa and Beyond,” Maya File 1999.16.
  238. Boot, Erik, “Some Short Notes on the T77 Substitution Set:  T627a as the Syllable Ch’a,”  Maya File 1999.19.
  239. Boot, Erik, “A New Title at Chichen Itsa:  Hun Yahawal Winik.  Notes and Questions Relative to the Yahaw-collocation,”  Maya File 1999.20.
  240. Boot, Erik, “Yabnal as the Toponym for Chich’en Itsa,”  Maya File 1999.21.
  241. Boot, Erik, “Ruling at Chich’en Its’a:  The Legitimate Claim to Power by K’ak’ U Pakal,”  Maya File 1999.22.
  242. Boot, Erik, “Short Notes on the Inscriptions and Iconography of Chich’en Itsa and Beyond, Part II,” Maya File 1999.23.
  243. Boot, Erik, “The ‘Star-Over-Shell/Earth’ as Haykah ‘Destroy Villages’,” Maya File 1999.24.
  244. Boot, Erik, “On the Possible Ethnic Identity of the Kanal Polity:  Ukan/Uchan.  A Proposal,” Maya File 1999.25.
  245. Boot, Erik, “Images of Writing:  The Knot-eye Glyph as Hun and the Print-out Tree as An-ul,” Maya File 1999.26.
  246. Boot, Erik, “‘No Place Like Home’:  Maya Exodus, Itsa Maya Migrations between ca. A.D. 650 and A.D. 1450,” Maya File 1999.27.
  247. Boot, Erik and Ruth Krochock, “A Reading of T55 as Ol and T59.55 as Ti Ol,” Maya File 1999.32.
  248. Brisko, Jo Ann Roman, “Aztec Goddesses:  A Historical Perspective,”  Maya File 1999.33.
  249. Carlson, John B., “The Teotihuacan Symbol System:  Some General Thoughts with an Analysis of the Trapeze-and-Ray Sign and the Bar-with-Three-Dots Sign,” Archaeoastronomy Research Letters No. 21, Maya File 1999.37.
  250. Fash, William L., “Regional Interaction in the Southeastern Maya Area:  An Epigraphic Approach,”  Maya File 1999.53.
  251. Headrick, Annabeth, “The Teotihuacan Trinity:  UnMASKing the Political Structure,” (Dissertation, 1996)  Maya File 1999.63.
  252. Cash, Cristin Loren, “Blood Woman, Blood Queen:  An Exploration of Gender, Politics and the Maya,” Maya File 1999.supp 15.
  253. Christenson, Allen J., “Weaving the Fabric of the Cosmos,”  Maya File 1999.supp. 16.
  254. Gossen, Gary H., “Death and Immortality among the Contemporary Maya of Highland Chiapas,”  Maya File 1999.supp 18.
  255. Wagner, Elizabeth, “Some Remarks on the ‘Tomb of the Scribe’ Below Str. 10L-26,” Maya File 1999.supp. 25.
  256. Wagner, Elizabeth, “Thoughts on the chak te-/kalom te- Title,”  Maya File 1999.216.
  257. Wagner, Elizabeth, “The Father of Butz’ Chan,”  Maya File 1999.217.
  258. Wichman, Soren, “A Ch’orti’ Morphological Sketch,” Maya File 1999.supp 26.
  259. Zender, Marc, “The Toponyms of El Cayo, Piedras Negras and La Mar,” Maya File 1999.supp 27.
  260. Schele, Linda, “Ancient Maya Writing and Calligraphy,” Maya File ??.
  261. Stuart, David, “Ten Phonemes,” Maya File ??.
  262. Lounsbury, Floyd G., “A Palenque King and the Planet Jupiter,” Maya File ??.
  263. Lounsbury, Floyd G., “The Identities of the Mythological Figures in the Cross Group Inscriptions of Palenque,” Maya File ??.
  264. Schele, Linda, “Some Thoughts on the Inscriptions of House C,” Maya File ??.
  265. Anderson, Lloyd B., “Dresden Codex Almanac 59: Leftwards Subtractive Counting,” Maya File 4.
  266. Calvin, Inga E., “Images of the Supernatural on Classic Period Pottery,” Maya File 45.
  267. Carlson, John B., “Venus-regulated Warfare and Ritual Sacrifice in Mesoamerica: Teotihuacan and the Cacaxtla “Star Wars” Connection,” Maya File 256.
  268. Cohodas, Marvin, “The Date Bird Jaguar IV’s Ball Game: Mathematical Contrivance and Venus Cycles,” Maya File 64.
  269. Cohodas, Marvin, “Bird Jaguar’s Secondary Wives: A Curious Pattern in the Yaxchilan Lintels,” Maya File 63.
  270. Cohodas, Marvin, “Yaxchilan’s Lintel 26: A Rationale for the Placement of the Calendar Round Date,” Maya File 65.
  271. Culbert, T. Patrick, “Maya Ceramics,” Maya File ??.
  272. Grube, Nikolai, “Epigraphic Research at Caracol, Belize,” Maya File 274.
  273. Villacorta and Villacorta, Dresden Codex, Maya File 59.
  274. Coe, Michael D., Grolier Codex, Maya File 60.
  275. Villacorta and Villacorta, Codice de Madrid, Maya File 61.
  276. Villacorta and Villacorta, Paris Codex, Maya File 62.
  277. Norman, V. Garth, “Measure in Mesoamerican Sculptural Art,” Maya File 165.
  278. Norman, V. Garth, “Geometry and Measure in Mesoamerican Monumental Art,” Maya File 164.
  279. Norman, V. Garth, “Astronomical Orientations of Izapa Sculptures,” Maya File 163.
  280. Justeson, John S., “Iwal as a Reading of the Posterior Event Indicator (T679a) of Mayan Hieroglyphic Writing,” Maya File 106.
  281. Justeson, John S., “An Interpretation of the Classic Maya Hieroglyphic Spelling of ‘East’,” Maya File 107.
  282. Stross, Brian, “Color Symbolism of a Maya Glyph: The Kan Cross,” Maya File 222.
  283. Stross, Brian, “Classic Maya Directional Glyphs,” Maya File 221.
  284. Stross, Brian, “Oppositional Pairing in Mesoamerican Divinatory Day Names,” Maya File 225.
  285. Stross, Brian, “Maya Bloodletting and the Number Three,” Maya File 224.
  286. Stross, Brian, “The Language of La Mojarra Stela 1: Fish and Maize,” Maya File 223.
  287. Stross, Brian, “Decipherment of La Mojarra Stela 1,” Maya File 223.
  288. Stross, Brian and Kent Reilly, “Sky and Earth: From Icon to Glyph,” Maya File 220.
  289. Kerr, Justin, “Subject Data Base for Maya Vases,” Maya File 114.
  290. MacLeod, Barbara, “Numen of the Night Sun,” in New Paltz Comix #4 . Mythos, Look Mom Comix! and Moods Publishing, Austin, Texas, 1983, p. 17.
  291. MacLeod, Barbara, “Numen of the Night Sun, Part Two,” in New Paltz Comix #4 . Mythos, Look Mom Comix! and Moods Publishing, Austin, Texas, 1983, p. 28.
  292. MacLeod, Barbara, North Austin Hieroglyphic Hunches, Maya File 126.
    1. “The T614 ‘Thatch’ and T79 ‘Anniversary Verb’ Glyphs,” 1-25-91
    2. “T153, The ‘Crossed Batons’ Glyph,” 2-5-91
    3. “The T712 “Lancet” Glyph,” 2-8-91
    4. “The Elusive T128,” 2-9-91
    5. “Maya Genesis: The First Steps,” 2-10-91
    6. “T135 (The G9 Superfix) and T108 (The ‘Guardian’ Superfix),” 2-10-91
    7. “The DNIG, T573,” 2-10-91
    8. “The Classic Name for Cumku,” 2-22-91
    9. “The Flat-Hand Verb,” 4-17-91
    10. “T128: A Reprise,” 4-18-91
    11. North Austin Half-Baked Glyphic Possibilities #2, “Might T128 Really be ch’a(i) After All?,” 4-20-91
  293. Reents-Budet, Dorie, “Narrative in Classic Maya Art,” Maya File 178.
  294. Grube, Nikolai, “An Investigation of the Primary Standard Sequence on Classic Maya Ceramics,” Maya File ??.
  295. Schele, Linda, “A Preliminary Study of Pictorial Devices Used in Maya Narrative Art,” Maya File 193.
  296. Reents, Dorie, “Inter-Site Dynastic Relations Recorded on a Plate from Holmul, Guatemala,” Maya File 176.
  297. Stuart, David, “Comments on a Marble Onyx Bowl at Dumbarton Oaks,” Maya File 227.
  298. Stuart, David, “The ‘Lu-Bat’ Glyph and its Bearing on the Primary Standard Sequence,” Maya File 226.
  299. Stuart, David, “The Hieroglyphs on a Vessel from Tomb 19, Rio Azul,” Maya File 229.
  300. Stuart, David, “Epigraphic Evidence of Political Organization in the Usumacinta Drainage,” Maya File 228.
  301. Reents, Dorie J., “The Late Classic Maya ‘Codex Style’ Pottery,” Maya File 177.
  302. Carlson, John B., “Venus-Regulated Warfare and Ritual Sacrifice in Mesoamerica,” Maya File 279.
  303. Schele, Linda and Jeffrey H. Miller, The Mirror, The Rabbit, and the Bundle: ‘Accession’ Expressions from the Classic Maya Inscriptions, Studies in Pre-Columbian Art & Archaeology Number Twenty Five, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington DC, 1983.
  304. Fasques, Alfredo Barrera and Sylvanus Griswold Morley, “The Maya Chronicles,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume X, No. 48, 1949.
  305. Roys, Ralph L., “Guide to the Codex Perez,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume X, No. 49, 1949.
  306. Roys, Ralph L., “The Prophecies for the Maya Tuns or Years in the Books of Chilam Balam of Tizimin and Mani,” Contributions to American Archaeology, Volume X, No. 51, 1949.
  307. Willey, Gordon, Ed., Archaeology of Southern Mesoamerica, Part One, Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volume 2, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1965,
    1. Borhegyi, Stephen F., “Archaeological Synthesis of the Guatemalan Highlands,” pp. 3-58.
    2. Borhegyi, Stephen F., “Settlement Patterns of the Guatemalan Highlands,” pp. 59-75.
    3. Smith, A. Ledyard, “Architecture of the Guatemalan Highlands,” pp. 76-94.
    4. Rands, Robert L. and Robert E. Smith, “Pottery of the Guatemalan Highlands,” pp. 95-145.
    5. Kidder, Alfred V., “Preclassic Pottery Figurines of the Guatemalan Highlands,” pp. 146-155.
    6. Rands, Robert L., “Classic and Postclassic Pottery Figurines of the Guatemalan Highlands,” pp. 156-162.
    7. Woodbury, Richard B., “Artifacts of the Guatemalan Highlands,” pp. 163-179.
    8. Shook, Edwin M., “Archaeological Survey of the Pacific Coast of Guatemala,” pp. 180-194.
    9. Lowe, Garth W. and J. Alden Mason, “Archaeological Survey of the Chiapas Coast, Highlands, and Upper Grijalva Basin,” pp. 195-236.
    10. Miles, S. W., “Sculpture of the Guatemala-Chiapas Highlands and Pacific Slopes, and Associated Hieroglyphs,” pp. 237-275.
    11. Miles, S. W., Summary of Preconquest Ethnology of the Guatemala-Chiapas Highlands and Pacific Slopes,” pp. 276-287.
    12. Andrews, E. Wyllys, “Archaeology and Prehistory in the Northern Maya Lowlands: An Introduction,” pp. 288-330.
    13. Thompson, J. Eric S., “Archaeological Synthesis of the Southern Maya Lowlands,” pp. 331-359.
    14. Willey, Gordon R. and William R. Bullard, Jr., “Prehistoric Settlement Patterns in the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 360-377.
    15. Pollock, Harry E. D., “Architecture of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 378-440.
    16. Lhuillier, Alberto Ruiz, “Tombs and Funerary Practices of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 441-461.
    17. Coe, William R., “Caches and Offertory Practices of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 462-468.
    18. Prouskouriakoff, Tatiana, “Sculpture and Major Arts of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 469-497.
    19. Smith, Robert E. and James C. Gifford, “Pottery of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 498-534.
    20. Rands, Robert L. and Barbara C. Rands, “Pottery Figurines of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 535-560.
  308. Willey, Gordon, Ed., Archaeology of Southern Mesoamerica, Part Two, Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volume 3, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1965,
    1. Rands, Robert L., “Jades of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 561-580.
    2. Mahler, Joy, “Garments and Textiles of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 581-593.
    3. Coe, William R., “Artifacts of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 594-602.
    4. Satterthwaite, Lincoln, “Calendrics of the Maya Lowlands,” pp. 603-631.
    5. Thompson, J. Eric S., “Maya Hieroglyphic Writing,” pp. 632-658.
    6. Roys, Ralph L., “Lowland Maya Native Society at Spanish Contact,” pp. 659-678.
    7. Coe, Michael D., “Archaeological Synthesis of Southern Veracruz and Tabasco,” pp. 679-715.
    8. Stirling, Matthew W., “Monumental Sculpture of Southern Veracruz and Tabasco,” pp. 716-738.
    9. Coe, Michael D., “The Olmec Style and its Distribution,” pp. 739-775.
    10. Scholes, France V. and Dave Warren, “The Olmec Region at Spanish Contact,” pp. 776-787.
    11. Bernal, Ignacio, “Archaeological Synthesis of Oaxaca,” pp. 788-813.
    12. Acosta, Jorge R., “Preclassic and Classic Architecture of Oaxaca,” pp. 814-836.
    13. Bernal, Ignacio, “Architecture in Oaxaca after the End of Monte Alban,” pp. 837-848.
    14. Caso, Alfonso, “Sculpture and Mural Painting of Oaxaca,” pp. 849-870.
    15. Caso, Alfonso and Ignacio Bernal, “Ceramics of Oaxaca,” pp. 871-895.
    16. Caso, Alfonso, “Lapidary Work, Goldwork, and Copperwork from Oaxaca,” pp. 896-930.
    17. Caso, Alfonso, “Zapotec Writing and Calendar,” pp. 931-947.
    18. Caso, Alfonso, “Mixtec Writing and Calendar,” pp. 948-961.
    19. Spores, Ronald, “The Zapotec and Mixtec at Spanish Contact,” pp. 962-990.
  309. Tedlock, Dennis, Breath on the Mirror: Mythic Voices and Visions of the Living Maya, New Edition 1997, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1993.
  310. Tedlock, Dennis, Breath on the Mirror: Mythic Voices and Visions of the Living Maya, Harper, San Francisco, 1993.
  311. Tedlock, Dennis, Days from a Dream Almanac, University of Illinois Press, Urbana and Chicago, 1990.
  312. Tedlock, Dennis, Popol Vuh: The Definitive Edition of the Mayan Book of the Dawn of Life and the Glories of Gods and Kings, Revised and Expanded, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1996.
  313. Tedlock, Dennis, Popol Vuh: The Definitive Edition of the Mayan Book of the Dawn of Life and the Glories of Gods and Kings, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1985.
  314. de Landa, Friar Diego, Yucatan: Before and After the Conquest, Translated with Notes by William Gates, Publication No. 20, The Maya Society, Baltimore, 1937 (Republished by Produccion Editorial Dante, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, 1990).
  315. de Landa, Friar Diego, Yucatan: Before and After the Conquest, Translated with Notes by William Gates, Publication No. 20, The Maya Society, Baltimore, 1937 (Republished by Dover, 1978).
  316. Schele, Linda, Workbook for XIVth Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop at Texas, “Tikal,” Art Department, University of Texas, Austin, 1990.
  317. Schele, Linda, Workbook for XVth Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop at Texas, “Yaxchilan: The Life and Times of Bird-Jaguar,” Art Department, University of Texas, Austin, 1991.
  318. Schele, Linda, Workbook for XVIth Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop at Texas, “Origins,” Department of Art and Art History and The Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1992.
  319. Schele, Linda and Peter Mathews, Notebook for XVIIth Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop at Texas, “The Dynastic History of Palenque,” Department of Art and Art History, The College of Fine Arts, The College of Liberal Arts, and The Institute of the Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1993.
  320. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, Notebook for the XVIIIth Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop, “Tlaloc-Venus Warfare: The Peten Wars 8.17.0.0.0—9.15.13.0.0,” Department of Art and Art History, The College of Fine Arts, The Center for Mexican Studies, and The Institute of the Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1994.
  321. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, Notebook for the XIXth Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop at Texas, “The Last Two Hundred Years: Transmission, Termination, Transformation,” Department of Art and Art History, The College of Fine Arts, The Center for Mexican Studies, and The Institute of the Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1995.
  322. Schele, Linda and Mathew Looper, Notebook for XXth Maya Hieroglyphic Forum, “Quirigua and Copan,” Department of Art and Art History, The College of Fine Arts, and The Institute of the Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1996.
  323. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, Notebook for the XXIst Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop, “The Dresden Codex,” Department of Art and Art History, The College of Fine Arts, and The Institute of the Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1997.
  324. Schele, Linda, Nikolai Grube and Simon Martin, Notebook for the XXIIst Maya Hieroglyphic Forum, “Deciphering Maya Politics,” Department of Art and Art History, The College of Fine Arts, and The Institute of the Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1998.
  325. Grube, Nikolai and Simon Martin, Notebook for the XXIVth Maya Hieroglyphic Forum, “Tikal and Its Neighbors,” Department of Art and Art History, The College of Fine Arts, and The Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 2000.
  326. Wanyerka, Phil, Transcriber, The Proceedings of The Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop: Tikal, March 10-11, 1990, University of Texas, Austin, 1990.
  327. Wanyerka, Phil, Transcriber, The Proceedings of The Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop: Origins, March 14-15, 1992, University of Texas, Austin, 1992.
  328. Wanyerka, Phil, Transcriber, The Proceedings of The Maya Hieroglyphic Workshop: Late Classic and Terminal Classic Warfare, March 11-12, 1995, University of Texas, Austin, 1995.
  329. Jones, Tom and Carolyn Jones, Maya Hieroglyphic Workbook, U Mut Maya, Arcata CA, September, 1995.
  330. Schele, Linda, ed., Texas Notes on Precolumbian Art, Writing, and Culture, Center for the History and Art of Ancient American Culture (CHAAAC), University of Texas, Austin.
    1. Schele, Linda, Peter Mathews and Floyd Lounsbury, “Redating the Hauberg Stela,” September, 1990.
    2. Schele, Linda, “The Palenque War Panel: Commentary on the Inscriptions,” September, 1990.
    3. Schele, Linda and Peter Mathews, “A Proposed Decipherment for a Portion of Resbalon Stair 1,” September, 1990.
    4. Schele, Linda, Peter Mathews and Floyd Lounsbury, “Untying the Headband,” September, 1990.
    5. Schele, Linda, “Ba as ‘First’ in Classic Period Titles”, September, 1990.
    6. Schele, Linda, Peter Mathews and Floyd Lounsbury, “The Nal Suffix at Palenque and Elsewhere,” September, 1990.
    7. Looper, Matthew G., “Observations on the Glyph for ‘Manikin’,” April, 1991.
    8. Fahsen, Federico and Linda Schele, “A Proposed Reading for the ‘Penis-Perforation’ Glyph,” April, 1991.
    9. Schele, Linda, “Further Adventures with T128 ch’a, April, 1991.
    10. Looper, Matthew G., “The Peccaries Above and Below Us,” May, 1991.
    11. Looper, Matthew G., “A Reinterpretation of the Wooden Box from Tortuguero,” May, 1991.
    12. Schele, Linda and Federico Fahsen, “A Substitution Pattern in Curl-Snout’s Name,” September, 1991.
    13. Fahsen, Federico and Linda Schele, “Curl-Snout Under Scrutiny, Again,” September, 1991.
    14. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Tzuk in the Classic Maya Inscriptions,” September, 1991.
    15. Schele, Linda, Peter Mathews, Nikolai Grube, Floyd Lounsbury, and David Kelley, “New Readings of Glyphs for the Month Kumk’u and their Implications,” September, 1991.
    16. Schele, Linda, “Some Observations on the War Expressions at Tikal,” September, 1991.
    17. Villela, Khristaan, “Early Notices on the Maya Paddler Gods,” September, 1991.
    18. Villela, Khristaan D., “A Tzuk Border Element on Palenque Temple of the Inscriptions Pier C,” December, 1991.
    19. Schele, Linda, “A Proposed Name for Rio Azul and a Glyph for ‘Water’,” September, 1991.
    20. Williams, Robert, “Codex Zouche-Nuttal ‘Obverse’: Summary of Contents,” September, 1991.
    21. Williams, Robert, “Codex Zouche-Nuttal ‘Obverse’: Pages 1-2: Lord 8-Wind Eagle-FLint: The Earth-Walker,” September, 1991.
    22. Williams, Robert, “Codex Zouche-Nuttal ‘Obverse’: Pages 14-22: A Catalogue of Events, Part 1,” September, 1991.
    23. Williams, Robert, “Codex Zouche-Nuttal ‘Obverse’: Pages 14-22: A Catalogue of Events, Part 2,” September, 1991.
    24. Williams, Robert, “Codex Zouche-Nuttal ‘Obverse’: Pages 36-41, or, The Peregrination of Four Lords from Apoala,” September, 1991.
    25. Looper, Matthew and Linda Schele, “A War at Palenque During the Reign of Ah-K’an,” September, 1991.
    26. Barrett, Rusty and Kam Manahan, “A New Luk’ at Two Stuccoes from Temple XVIII (Its’at Palenque),” September, 1991.
    27. Schele, Linda and Khristaan D. Villela, “Some New Ideas about the T713/757 ‘Accession’ Phrases,” December, 1991.
    28. Love, Bruce, “Another Glyph for Na,” October, 1992.
    29. Schele, Linda, Nikolai Grube and Federico Fahsen, “The Lunar Series in Classic Maya Inscriptions: New Observation and Interpretations,” October 1992.
    30. Looper, Matthew G., “Creation Mythology at Naranjo,” October, 1992.
    31. Looper, Matthew G., “The ‘Canoe Gods’,” October, 1992.
    32. Looper, Matthew G., “The Parentage of ‘Smoking-Squirrel’ of Naranjo,” October, 1992.
    33. MacLeod, Barbara, “Musings About the Rare Variants of Glyph A of the Lunar Series,” February, 1993.
    34. Schele, Linda, Federico Fahsen and Nikolai Grube, “El Zapote and the Dynasty of Tikal,” October, 1992.
    35. Fahsen, Federico, “A Toponym in Waxaktun,” December, 1992.
    36. Berlin, Heinrich, Translated by Khristaan D. Villela, “The ‘Emblem’ Glyph in Maya Inscriptions,” February, 1993.
    37. Berlin, Heinrich, Translated by Khristaan D. Villela, “Nominal Glyphs on the Palenque Sarcophagus,” February, 1993.
    38. Koontz, Rex and Isaac Cux Garcia, “K’awil in the Maya Highlands,” February , 1993.
    39. Villela, Khristaan D., “A New Curl-Snout Event on the Hombre de Tikal,” February, 1993.
    40. Villela, Khristaan D., “Parallel Throne Phrases at Tikal and Palenque,” February, 1993.
    41. Villela, Khristaan D. and Rex Koontz, “A Nose Piercing Ceremony in the North Temple of the Great Ballcourt at Chichen Itza,” February, 1993.
    42. Urcid, Javier, “Bones and Epigraphy: The Accurate Versus the Fictitious?” February, 1993.
    43. Stross, Brian, “Man in the Maw: An Olmec Way in the Sky,” February, 1993.
    44. Mathews, Peter, “The Emblem Glyph of Bonampak, Chiapas, Mexico,” March, 1993.
    45. Mathews, Peter, “A Painted Capstone at Becan, Campeche,” March, 1993.
    46. Mathews, Peter, “The ‘Bee Man’ of Tonina,” March, 1993.
    47. Mathews, Peter, “Tonina Dates I: A Glyph for the Period of 260 Days?” March, 1993.
    48. Mathews, Peter, “Tonina Dates II: The Date of Tonina F.35,” March, 1993.
    49. Mathews, Peter, “The Stucco Text Above the Piers of the Temple of the Inscriptions at Palenque,” March, 1993.
    50. Williams, Robert, Rex Koontz and Timothy Albright, “Eight Deer Plays Ball Again: Notes on a New Codiacal Cognate,” March, 1993.
    51. Frumker, Bruce, “Wuk Ah, The Fourth Lord of the Night,” March, 1993.
    52. McGee, R. Jon, “Palenque and Lacandon Maya Cosmology,” March, 1993.
    53. Gutierrez, Mary Ellen, “Ballcourts: The Chasms of Creation,” May, 1993.
    54. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Naranjo Altar 1 and Rituals of Death and Burials,” November, 1993.
    55. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Un verbo nakwa para ‘batallar o conquistar,” November, 1993.
    56. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Pi as ‘Bundle’,” December, 1993.
    57. Schele, Linda, “Creation and the Ritual of the Bakabs,” December, 1993.
    58. Looper, Matthew G., “Observations of the Morphology of Sprouts in Olmec Art,” November, 1993.
    59. Villela, Khristaan D., “Quirigua Zoomorph P and Three ‘Stones of Creation’,” December, 1993.
    60. Heimpel, Wolfgang, “Observations on the Meaning and Use of Pre-Hispanic Mexican Stamps,” January, 1994.
    61. Mathews, Peter, “On the Glyphs ‘West’ and ‘Mah K’ina’,” February, 1994.
    62. Villela, Khristaan D., “Concordance to and Notes on the Relaciones de Yucatan, 1579-1580,” January, 1994.
    63. Schele, Linda and Khristaan Villela, “The Helmet of the Chakte,” March, 1994.
    64. Rincon-Mautner, Carlos, “A Reconstruction of the History of San Miguel Tulancingo, Coixtlahuaca, Mexico, from Indigenous Painted Sources,” February, 1994.
    65. Matthews, Paul H., “Ch’akah U Tz’ibal: The Axing of History at Seibal,” February, 1994.
    66. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Tikal Altar 5,” March, 1994.
    67. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Some Revisions to Tikal’s Dynasty of Kings,” March, 1994.
    68. Schele, Linda and Paul Mathews, “The Last Kings of Seibal,” March, 1994.
    69. Schele, Linda, “An Alternative Reading for the Sky-Penis Title,” March, 1995.
    70. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Notes on the Chronology of Piedras Negras Stela 12,” August, 1994.
    71. Schele, Linda, “New Observations on the Oval Palace Tablet at Palenque,” October, 1994.
    72. Barnhart, Ed, “Groups of Four and Five Day Names in the Dresden Codex Almanacs: The First Twenty-three Pages,” June, 1995.
    73. van Akkeren, Ruud W., “The Scorpion and the Turtle,” June, 1995.
    74. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “New Observations on the Loltun Relief,” August, 1994.
    75. Christenson, Allen J., “Prehistory of the K’ichean People,” February, 1997.
    76. Anderson, E. N., “The Palenque Limpkins: A Marginal Note on Maya Archaeoethnozoology,” February, 1997.
    77. Boot, Erik, Matthew Looper and Elisabeth Wagner, “A New k’a Syllable: T627a/T538/T583,” March, 1996.
    78. Lacadena, Alfonso, “Cha’/ka’, Yax and Wi’il: Three Examples of Adverbial Use Adjectives in Classic Maya Inscriptions,” March, 1997.
    79. Krochock, Ruth, “A New Interpretation of the Inscriptions on the Temple of the Hieroglyphic Jambs, Chichen Itza,” March, 1997.
    80. Wald, Robert, “The Politics of Art and History at Palenque: Interplay of Text and Iconography on the Tablet of the Slaves,” March, 1997.
  331. Johnson, Richard E., “Dresden 13b-14b” A Reading of “Mak’” for T74-669a,” Maya File 95; Maya File 1999.79.
  332. Johnson, Richard E., “Dresden 4c-5c(1): A Reading of “Tum” for T91-19,” Maya File 96; Maya File 1999.80.
  333. Johnson, Richard E., “Notes on T114 and T16,” Maya File 97; Maya File 1999.81.
  334. Johnson, Richard E., “A Cuide to Conversion of Julian Dates, Julian Day Numbers & a Comparison of Various Computer Programs,” Maya File 316a, 1996.
  335. Johnson, Richard E., “The Dresden Codex, Pages 43b(2-3)-D45b, The Mars Table: A General Ephemeris of the Visible Superior Planets,” Working Notes, Maya File 316b, 1997.
  336. Johnson, Richard E., “Solar Eclipses at Tikal, A.D. 0010 to A.D. 1600: With Lunar Intervals,” Maya File 316c, Maya File 324, 1995; Maya File 1999.82.
  337. Johnson, Richard E. and Michel Quenon, “Comments on the Paris Codex Pages 23 & 24: A Maya Zodiac,” Maya File 316d, 1992.
  338. Lounsbury, Floyd G., “A Solution for the Number 1.5.5.0 of the Mayan Venus Table,” Maya File 316f, n.d.
  339. Lounsbury, Floyd G., “A Derivation of the Mayan-To-Julian Calendar Correlation from the Dresden Codex Chronology,” Maya File 316g, n.d.
  340. Barnhart, Edwin Lawrence, A Report on the First Twenty Three Pages of the Dresden Codex and Xochicalco: An Ancient Ceremonial Site in the State of Morelos, Mexico, Master’s Thesis, University of Texas at Austin, Maya File 321, 1996.
  341. Powell, Christopher, A New View on Maya Astronomy, Master’s Thesis, University of Texas at Austin, Maya File 320, 1997.
  342. Looper, Matthew George, The Sculpture Programs of Butz’-Tiliw, An Eighth-Century Maya King of Quirigua, Guatemala, Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin, Maya File 295, 1995.
  343. Quizar, Robin, “Ergativity in the Cholan Languages,” Maya File 175; Maya File 1999.148.
  344. Attinasi, John, “Lak T’an: A Grammar of Chol (Mayan),” Maya File 343, 1973.
  345. Fash, William, ed., The Copan Notes (Las Apuntas de Copan), Maya File 197, Kinko’s, Austin.
    1. Schele, Linda and David Stuart, “Te-Tun as the Glyph for ‘Stela’,” 1986.
    2. Stuart, David, “A Glyph for ‘Stone Incensario’,”, 1986.
    3. Schele, Linda and David Stuart, “The Chronology of Altar U,” 1986.
    4. Stuart, David, “The Hieroglyphic Name of Altar U,” 1986.
    5. Schele, Linda, “Paraphrase of the Text of Altar U,” 1986.
    6. Stuart, David and Linda Schele, “Yax-K’uk-Mo’, The Founder of the Lineage of Copan,” 1986.
    7. Stuart, David, “The ‘First Ruler’ on Stela 24,” 1989.
    8. Schele, Linda, “The Founders of Lineages at Copan and Other Maya Sites,” 1986.
    9. Stuart, David, “Substitution in the Emblem Glyph of Copan,” never written.
    10. Stuart, David, “The Protagonists of Altar G, U, and T”, never written.
    11. Stuart, David, “Thoughts on the Temple Inscription from Structure 26,” 1986.
    12. Stuart, David, “The Chronology of Stela 4 at Copan,” 1986.
    13. Schele, Linda, “The Figures on the Central Ballcourt Marker of Ballcourt IIa at Copan,” 1986.
    14. Schele, Linda and David Stuart, “Butz’-Chaan, The 11th Successor of the Yax-K’uk-Mo’ Lineage, 1986.
    15. Schele, Linda, “Moon-Jaguar, The 10th Successof of the Lineage of Yax-K’uk-Mo’ of Copan,” 1986.
    16. Schele, Linda and David Stuart, “Waterlily-Jaguar, The Seventh Successor of the Lineage of Yax-K’uk-Mo’,” 1986.
    17. Stuart, David and Linda Schele, “Interim Report on the Hieroglyphic Stair of Structure 26,” 1986.
    18. Stuart, David, “The Step Inscription of Temple 22 at Copan,” 1986.
    19. Schele, Linda, “Interim Report on the Iconography of the Architectural Sculpture of Temple 22 (From the 1986 Field Season),” 1986.
    20. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “The Brother of Yax-Pac,” 1987.
    21. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “U Cit Tok, The Last King of Copan,” 1987.
    22. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “The Birth Monument of Butz’-Chaan,” 1987.
    23. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “The Date on the Bench from Structure 9N-82, Sepulturas, Copan, Honduras,” 1987.
    24. Schele, Linda, “The Human Figures on the Legs of the Scribe’s Bench,” 1987.
    25. Schele, Linda, “The Protagonists and Dating of Stela E,” 1987.
    26. Schele, Linda, “A Possible Death Date for Smoke-Imix-God K,” 1987.
    27. Schele, Linda, “A Brief Commentary on a Hieroglyphic Cylinder from Copan,” 1987.
    28. Schele, Linda, “Wan, The ‘Standing Up’ of Stela A,” 1987.
    29. Schele, Linda, “New Dates on the Paddlers from Butz’-Chaan of Copan,” 1987.
    30. Schele, Linda, “Stela I and the Founding of the City of Copan,” 1987.
    31. Schele, Linda, “The Inscription on Stela 5 and its Altar,” 1987.
    32. Schele, Linda, “The Reviewing Stand of Temple 11,” 1987.
    33. Schele, Linda, “The Surviving Fragments of Stela 9,” 1987.
    34. Schele, Linda, “A Cached Jade from Temple 26 and the World Tree,” 1987.
    35. Schele, Linda, “The Dedication of Structure 2 and a New Form of the God N Event,” 1987.
    36. Schele, Linda, “Two Altar Names at Copan,” 1987.
    37. Schele, Linda, “Notes on the Rio Amarillo Altars,” 1987.
    38. Schele, Linda, “New Fits on the North Panel of the West Door of Temple 11,” 1987.
    39. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “The Father of Smoke-Shell,” 1988.
    40. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Cu-Ix, The Fourth Ruler of Copan and His Monuments,” 1988.
    41. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “A Venus Title on Copan Stela F,” 1988.
    42. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “A Future Marker on a Hand Scattering Verb at Copan,” 1988.
    43. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “A Quadrant Tree at Copan,” 1988.
    44. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Stela 13 and the East Quadrant of Copan,” 1988.
    45. Schele, Linda, “Revisions to the Dynastic Chronology of Copan,” 1988.
    46. Schele, Linda, “Altar F’ and Structure 32,” 1988.
    47. Alexander, Helen, “The 260-day Periods on Stela A and 3,” 1988.
    48. McCready, Mary, Barbara MacLeod, Vito Veliz, Peter Keeler and Ruth Krochock, “A Suggested Reading Order for Stela 6 at Copan,” 1988.
    49. MacLeod, Barbara, “Renaming a Copan King: Phonetic Evidence for a More Accurate Rendering of the Name ‘Smoke-Imix-God K’,”1988.
    50. MacLeod, Barbara, “The ‘Ninth Child of the Lineage’: An Alternative Dynastic Reference to Moon-Jaguar on Stela 9 at Copan,” 1988.
    51. Schele, Linda, “A House Dedication on the Harvard Bench at Copan,” 1989.
    52. MacLeod, Barbara, “The Text of Altar F’: Further Considerations,” 1989.
    53. Schele, Linda, “A New Glyph for ‘Five’ on Stela E,” 1989.
    54. Stross, Brian, “A Note on the Copan Emblem Glyph,” 1989.
    55. Grube, Nikolai and Barbara MacLeod, “A Primary Standard Sequence on Copan Altar K,” 1989.
    56. Stuart, David, Nikolai Grube, Linda Schele and Floyd Lounsbury, “Stela 63, A New Monument from Copan,” 1989.
    57. Schele, Linda, David Stuart, Nikolai Grube and Floyd Lounsbury, “A New Inscription from Temple 22a at Copan,” 1989.
    58. Stuart, David, Nikolai Grube and Linda Schele, “A Substitution Set for the ‘Macuch/Batab’ Title”, 1989.
    59. Grube, Nikolai, Linda Schele, David Stuart and William Fash, “The Date of Dedication of Ballcourt III at Copan,” 1989.
    60. Grube, Nikolai, David Stuart and Linda Schele, “A Possible Death Reference for Yax-Kuk-Mo,” 1989.
    61. Stuart, David, Nikolai Grube and Linda Schele, “A New Alternative for the Date of the Sepulturas Bench,” 1989.
    62. Stuart, David, Linda Schele and Nikolai Grube, “A Mention of 18 Rabbit on the Temple 11 Reviewing Stand,” 1989.
    63. Stuart, David, “Comments on the Temple 22 Inscription,” 1989.
    64. Schele, Linda, David Stuart and Nikolai Grube, “A Commentary on the Restoration and Reading of the Glyphic Panels from Temple 11, 1989.
    65. Schele, Linda, “The Numbered-Katun Titles of Yax-Pac,” 1989.
    66. Schele, Linda, “A Brief Commentary on the Top of Altar Q,” 1989.
    67. Schele, Linda, “Some Further Thoughts on the Quirigua-Copan Connection,” 1989.
    68. Grube, Nikolai, “A Reference to Water-Lily Jaguar on Caracol Stela 16,” 1990.
    69. Schele, Linda, “ ‘End of’ Expression at Copan and Palenque,” 1990.
    70. Schele, Linda, “The Early Classic Dynastic History of Copan: Interim Report 1989,” 1990.
    71. Schele, Linda, “The Glyph for ‘Hole’ and the Skeletal Maw of the Underworld,” 1990.
    72. Schele, Linda, “Preliminary Commentary on a New Altar from Structure 32,” 1990.
    73. Schele, Linda, “Further Comments on Stela 6,” 1990.
    74. Schele, Linda, “A New Fragment from Altar J’,” 1990.
    75. Schele, Linda, “Early Quirigua and the Kings of Copan,” 1990.
    76. Morales, Alfonso, Julie Miller and Linda Schele, “The Dedication Stair of ‘Ante’ Structure,” 1990.
    77. Bardsley, Sandy, “Brothers and Others: New Insights from ‘New’ Incensarios,” 1990.
    78. Schele, Linda and Alfonso Morales, “A New Fragment from Structure 22-26th at Copan,” 1990.
    79. Schele, Linda and Alfonso Morales, “Some Thoughts on Two Jade Pendants from the Termination Cache of ‘Ante’ Pyramid at Copan,” 1990.
    80. Schele, Linda, “Speculations from an Epigrapher on Things Archaeological,” 1990.
    81. Schele, Linda, “Lounsbury’s Contrived Numbers and Two 8 Eb Dates at Copan,” 1990.
    82. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Two Early Monuments from Copan,” 1990.
    83. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Six-Staired Ballcourts,” 1990.
    84. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “A Tentative Identification of the Second Successor of the Copan Dynasty,” 1990.
    85. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “A New Interpretation of the Temple 18 Jambs,” 1990.
    86. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “The Glyph for Plaza or Court,” 1990.
    87. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Royal Gifts to Subordinate Lords,” 1990.
    88. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “A Suggested Reading Order for the West Side of Stela A,” 1990.
    89. Schele, Linda, “Commentary on Altar G’,” 1990.
    90. Schele, Linda, “A Possible Death Statement for 18-Rabbit,” 1990.
    91. Grube, Nikola and Linda Schele, “Two Examples of the Glyph for ‘Step’ from the Hieroglyphic Stairs,” 1990.
    92. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Building, Court, and Mountain Names in the Text of the Hieroglyphic Stairs,” 1990.
    93. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “A Preliminary Inventory of Place Names in the Copan Inscriptions,” 1990.
    94. Kerr, Justin, “A Scribe on Stela 63 at Copan,” 1991.
    95. Looper, Matthew, “The Name of Copan and of a Dance at Yaxchilan,” 1991.
    96. Schele, Linda and Elizabeth Newsome, “Taking the Headband at Copan,” 1991.
    97. Schele, Linda and Barbara Fash, “A New Assessment of Smoke-Monkey, The 14th Successor in the Line of Yax-K’uk-Mo’, ” 1991.
    98. Schele, Linda, David Stuart and Nikolai Grube, “A Commentary on the Inscriptions of Structure 22A at Copan,” 1991.
    99. Schele, Linda and Rudy Larios, “Some Venus Dates on the Hieroglyphic Stair at Copan,” 1991.
    100. Schele, Linda and Barbara Fash, “Venus and the Reign of Smoke-Monkey,” 1991.
    101. Schele, Linda, “Venus in the Monuments of Smoke-Imix-God K and the Great Plaza,” 1991.
    102. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Speculations on Who Built the House Under Temple 11,” 1991.
    103. Schele, Linda, “Another Look at Stela 11,” 1991.
    104. Schele, Linda, “The Initial Series Dates on Stelae 2 and 12,” 1992.
    105. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “New Information on the Earlier Date on the Ante Stair,” 1992.
    106. Grube, Nikolai and Linda Schele, “Yet Another Look at Stela 11,” 1992.
    107. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “The Founding Events at Copan,” 1992.
    108. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Venus, The Great Plaza, and Recalling the Dead,” 1992.
    109. Villela, Khristaan D., “Ceiba Flower Titles,” 1993.
    110. MacLeod, Barbara, “Daughter of ‘Yet Another Look at Stela 11’,” 1993.
    111. Schele, Linda, “A Reexamination of U-Yak’-Chak,” 1993.
    112. Wagner, Elisabeth, “A Possible Birth Statement for Waxaklahun-U-Bah-K’awil,” 1994.
    113. Sedat, David W. and Sharer, Robert J., “The Xukpi Stone: A Newly Discovered Early Classic Inscription from the Copan Acropolis,” 1994.
    114. Schele, Linda, Nikolai Grube and Federico Fahsen, “The Xukpi Stone: A Newly Discovered Early Classic Inscription from the Copan Acropolis, Part II, Commentary on the Text (Version 2),” 1994.
    115. Schele, Linda and Matthew Looper, “The 9.17.0.0.0 Eclipse at Quirigua and Copan,” 1994.
    116. Schele, Linda and Nikolai Grube, “Who was Popol-K’inich? A Re-evaluation of the Second Successor in the Line of Yax-K’uk-Mo’ in Light of New Archaeological Evidence,” 1994.
    117. Schele, Linda, Federico Fahsen and Nikolai Grube, “The Floor Marker from Motmot,” 1994.
    118. Schele, Linda, “The Texts of Group 10L-2: A New Interpretation,” 1993.
    119. Looper, Matthew G. and Linda Schele, “The Founder of Quirigua, Tutum-Yol-K’inich,” 1994.
    120. Schele, Linda, “The Text in Temple 21a,” 1995.
    121. Grube, Nikolai, Linda Schele and Federico Fahsen, “The Tikal-Copan Connection: Evidence from External Relations, Version 2,” 1995.
    122. Schele, Linda, Nikolai Grube and Federico Fahsen, “The Tikal-Copan Connection: The Copan Evidence, Version 2,” 1995.
    123. Fahsen, Federico, Linda Schele and Nikolai Grube, “The Tikal-Copan Connection: Shared Features, Version 2,” 1995.
  346. Harris, John F. and Stephen K. Stearns, Understanding Maya Inscriptions: A Hieroglyph Handbook, The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, 1992.
  347. Harris, John F., A Supplement to Understanding Maya Inscriptions: New and Recent Maya Hieroglyph Readings, The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, 1993.
  348. Harris, John F., A Resource Bibliography for the Decipherment of Maya Hieroglyphs and New Maya Hieroglyph Readings, The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, 1994.
  349. Harris, John F. and Stephen K. Stearns, Understanding Maya Inscriptions: A Hieroglyph Handbook, Second Revised Edition, The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, 1997.
  350. Keeler, Peter, “A Guidebook to Austin, Texas, & The Glyphs,” Maya File 108.
  351. Jones, Tom, “A Short Guide to Maya Calendrical Glyphs,” Maya File 99.
  352. Jones, Tom, “Pay: A Proposed Reading for the “God N” Verb (Without Illustrations),” Maya File 100.
  353. Jones, Tom, “Vultures, Fog, and Snow: Some Notes on Maya Codices, Ancient and Modern,” Maya File 101.
  354. Thompson, J. Eric S., Maya History & Religion, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1970.
  355. Carrasco, David, Religions of Mesoamerica, Harper & Row, San Francisco, 1990.
  356. Duffett-Smitth, Astronomy with Your Personal Computer, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1985.
  357. Duffett-Smitth, Practical Astronomy with Your Calculator: Second Edition, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1979, 1982.
  358. Pennick, Nigel, The Pagan Book of Days, Destiny Books, Rochester, Vermont,1992.
  359. Michel, Genevieve, The Rulers of Tikal: A Historical Reconstruction and Field Guide to the Stelae, Publicaciones Vista, Guatemala, C. A., 1989.
  360. Whittaker, Arabelle and Viola Warkentin, Chol Texts on the Supernatural, Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, 1965.
  361. Silverberg, Robert, Clocks for the Ages: How Scientists Date the Past, Macmillan, New York, 1971.
  362. Silverberg, Robert, Frontiers in Archaeology, Chilton, New York, 1966.
  363. Silverberg, Robert, Men Against Time: Salvage Archaeology in the United States, Macmillan, New York, 1967.
  364. Silverberg, Robert, Mound Builders of Ancient America: The Archaeology of a Myth, New York Graphic Society, Greenwich, Connecticut, 1968.
  365. Silverberg, Robert, ed., Great Adventures in Archaeology, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, 1964.
    1. Belzoni, Giovanni Batista, “Within the Pyramid,” p. 3.
    2. Petrie, Flinders, “A Lifetime of Digging,” p. 33.
    3. Carter, Howard, “The Tomb of Tutankhamen,” p. 69.
    4. Layard, Austen Henry, “The Man who Found Ninevah,” p. 117.
    5. Hilprecht, H. V., “Disaster at Nippur,” p. 161.
    6. Koldewey, Robert, “The Rediscovery of Babylon,” p. 203.
    7. Woolley, C. Leonard, “The City of Abraham,” p. 245.
    8. Schliemann, Heinrich, “The Excavation of Troy,” p. 281.
    9. Stephens, John Lloyd, “An Explorer Buys a City,” p. 331.
    10. Thompson, E. H., “Into the Sacred Well,” p. 375.
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    1. Adams, Richard E.W. and T. Patrick Culbert, “The Origins of Civilization in the Maya Lowlands,” p. 3.
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    13. Webster, David L., “Warfare and the Evolution of Maya Civilization,” p. 335.
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  449. Culbert, T. Patrick, ed., The Classic Maya Collapse, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1973.
    1. Culbert, T. Patrick, “Introduction: A Prologue to Classic Maya Culture and the Problem of Its Collapse,” p. 3.
    2. Adams, Richard E. W., “The Collapse of Maya Civilization: A Review of Previous Theories,” p. 21.
    3. Sabloff, Jeremy A., “Major Themes in the Past Hypotheses of the Maya Collapse,” p. 35.
    4. Rands, Robert L., “The Classic Collapse in the Southern Maya Lowlands: Chronology,” p. 43.
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    6. Willey, Gordon R., “Certain Aspects of the Late Classic to Postclassic Periods in the Belize Valley,” 93.
    7. Sabloff, Jeremy A., “Continuity and Disruption During Terminal Late Classic Times at Seibal: Ceramic and Other Evidence,” p. 107.
    8. Adams, Richard E. W., “Maya Collapse: Transformation and Termination in the Ceramic Sequence at Altar de Sacrificios,” p. 133.
    9. Rands, Robert L., “The Classic Maya Collapse: Usumacinta Zone and the Northwestern Periphery,” 165.
    10. Graham, John A., “Aspects of Non-Classic Presences in the Inscriptions and Sculptural Art of Seibal,” p. 207.
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    13. Shimkin, Demitri R., “Models for the Downfall: Some Ecological and Culture-Historical Considerations,” p. 269.
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    1. Hammond, Norman, “Introduction,” p. 1.
    2. Mathews, Peter, “Classic Maya Emblem Glyphs,” p. 19.
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    4. Schele, Linda, “An Epigraphic History of the Western Maya Region,” p. 72.
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    7. Fash, William L. and David S. Stuart, “Dynastic History and Cultural Evolution at Copan, Honduras,” p. 147.
    8. Sharer, Robert S., “Diversity and Continuity in Maya Civilization: Quirigua as a Case Study,” p. 180.
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    11. Hammond, Norman, “Inside the Black Box: Defining Maya Polity,” p. 253.
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  454. Allen, Paula Gunn, The Sacred Hoop: Recovering the Feminine in American Indian Traditions, Beacon Press, Boston, 1992.
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    2. “When Women Throw Down Bundles: Strong Women Make Strong Nations,” p. 30.
    3. “Where I Come From is Like This,” p. 43.
    4. “The Sacred Hoop: A Contemporary Perspective,” p. 54.
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    7. “The Feminine Landscape of Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony,” p. 118.
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    9. “The Ceremonial Motion of Indian Time: Long Ago, So Far,” p. 147.
    10. “Answering the Deer: Genocide and Continuance in the Poetry of American Indian Women,” p. 155.
    11. “The Wilderness in My Blood: Spiritual Foundations of the Poetry of Five American Indian Women,” p. 165.
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    13. “How the West was Really Won,” p. 194.
    14. “Who is Your Mother? Red Roots of White Feminism,” p. 209.
    15. “Kochinnenako in Academe: Three Approaches to Interpreting a Keres Indian Tale,” p. 222.
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    1. Baudez, Claude F., “Iconography and History at Copan,” p. 17.
    2. Jones, Christopher and Robert J. Sharer, “Archaeological Investigations in the Site Core of Quirigua, Guatemala,” p. 27.
    3. Ashmore, Wendy, “Peten Cosmology in the Maya Southeast: An Analysis of Architecture and Settlement Patterns at Classic Quirigua,” p. 35.
    4. Cheek, Charles, “Construction Activity as a Measurement of Change at Copan, Honduras,” p. 50.
    5. Fash, WIlliam L., Jr., “History and Characteristics of Settlement in the Copan Valley, and Some Comparisons with Quirigua,” p. 72.
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    8. Schortman, Edward M., “Interaction between the Maya and Non-Maya Along the Late Classic Southeast Maya Periphery: The View from the Lower Motagua Valley, Guatemala,” p. 114.
    9. Leventhal, Richard M., “A Reexamination of Stela Caches at Copan: New Dates for Copador,” p. 138.
    10. Bishop, Ronald L, Marilyn P. Beaudry, Richard M. Leventhal and Robert J. Sharer, “Compositional Analysis of Copador and Related Pottery in the Southeast Maya Area,” p. 143.
    11. Willey, Gordon R., “Copan, Quirigua, and the Southeast Maya Zone: A Summary View,” p. 168.
    12. Kennedy, Nedenia C., “The Periphery Problem and Playa de los Muertos: A Test Case,” p. 179.
    13. Demarest, Arthur A. and Robert J. Sharer, “Late Preclassic Ceramic Spheres, Culture Areas, and Cultural Evolution in the Southeastern Highlands of Mesoamerica,” p. 194.
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    16. Fasquelle, Ricardo Agurcia, “Late Classic Settlements in the Comayagua Valley,” p. 262.
    17. Urban, Patricia A., “Precolumbian Settlement in the Naco Valley, Northwestern Honduras,” p. 275.
    18. Bruhns, Karen Olsen, “The Role of Commercial Agriculture in Early Postclassic Developments in Central El Salvador: The Rise and Fall of Cihuatan,” p. 296.
    19. Wonderley, Anthony, “Naco, Honduras—Some Aspects of a Late Precolumbian Community on the Eastern Maya Frontier,” p. 313.
    20. Baudez, Claude F., “Southeast Mesoamerican Periphery Summary,” p. 333.
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    4. Lawrence, Barbara, “Analysis of Unidentifiable Bone From Cayonu: An Early Village Farming Community,” p. 11.
    5. Meadow, Richard H., “Effects of Context on the Interpretation of Faunal Remains: A Case Study,” p. 15.
    6. Boessneck, Joachim and Angela von den Driesch, “The Significance of Measuring Animal Bones from Archaeological Sites,” p. 25.
    7. Uerpmann, Hans-Peter, “Metrical Analysis of Faunal Remains from the Middle East,” p. 41.
    8. Clutton-Brock, Juliet, “Bones for the Zoologist,” p. 49.
    9. Ducos, Pierre, “ ‘Domestication’ Defined and Methodological Approaches to its Recognition in Faunal Assemblages,” p. 53.
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    11. Redding, Richard W., “Rodents and the Archaeological Paleoenvironment: Considerations, Problems, and the Future,” p. 63.
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    14. Compagnoni, Bruno and Maurzio Tosi, “The Camel: Its Distribution and State of Domestication in the Middle East During the Third Millennium B. C. in Light of Finds from Shahr-I Sokhta,” p. 91.
    15. Compagnoni, Bruno, “The Bone Remains of Equus Hemionus from Shahr-I Sokhta,” p. 105.
    16. Compagnoni, Bruno, “The Bone Remains of Gazella Subgutturosa from Shahr-I Sokhta,” p. 105.
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  461. Branson, Oscar T., Hopi Indian Kachina Dolls, Treasure Chest Publications, Inc., Tucson, Arizona, 1992.
  462. Wright, Barton, Hopi Kachinas: The Complete Guide to Collecting Kachina Dolls, Northland Publishing, Flagstaff AZ, 1977.
  463. Rossini, Stephane, Egyptian Hieroglyphics: How to Read and Write Them, Dover, New York, 1989.
  464. Der Manuelian, Peter, Hieroglyphs from A to Z: A Rhyming Book with Ancient Egyptian Stencils for Kids, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1991.
  465. Washburn, Dorothy K. and Donald W. Crowe, Symmetries of Culture: Theory and Practice of Plane Pattern Analysis, University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1988.
  466. Baudez, Claude-Francois, Maya Sculpture of Copan: The Iconography, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1994.
  467. Aveni, Anthony, Stairways to the Stars: Skywatching in Three Great Ancient Cultures, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1997.
  468. Doane, Doris Chase, Time Changes in the USA, Graphics Arts Press, Downey, California, 1966.
  469. Kapout, Robert W. and Charles J. Lohrmann, Language of the Robe: American Indian Trade Blankets, Peregrine Smith Books, Salt Lake City, 1992 (I bought this one at the Pendleton Shop in Cottonwood Mall; when I came out, my wife said to me, “You’re the only one I know who can go into a clothing store and come out with a book.”).
  470. Jones, Owen, The Grammar of Ornament: All 100 Color Plates from the Folio Edition of the Great Victorian Sourcebook of Historic Design, Dover, New York, 1987.
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  473. Moskowitz, Joel, The Working Clock/Timer, The Paper Machine Series, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1985.
  474. Quirke, Stephen and Carol Andrews, The Rosetta Stone: Facsimile Drawing, Abrams, New York, 1988.
  475. Love, Bruce, The Paris Codex: Handbook for a Maya Priest, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1994.
  476. Robertson, Merle Greene, “The Ritual Bundles of Yaxchilan,” Maya File 180.
  477. Robertson, Merle Greene, ed., Third Palenque Round Table, 1978: Part 2, The Palenque Round Table Series Volume V, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1980.
    1. Robertson, Merle Green, “The Giles G. Healey 1946 Bonampak Photographs,” p. 3.
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  478. Robertson, Merle Greene, General Editor, Virginia M. Fields, Volume Editor, Sixth Palenque Round Table, 1986, The Palenque Round Table Series Volume 8, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1991.
    1. Gonzalez, Arnulfo Hardy, “Historical Notes on the Discovery of the Ruins, the Founding of the Town, and the Origin and Significance of the Name of Palenque,” p. 3.
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    6. Wren, Linnea H., “The Great Ball Court Stone from Chichen Itza,” p. 51.
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  479. Stone, Andrea J., Images from the Underworld: Naj Tunich and the Tradition of Maya Cave Painting, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1995.
  480. Willey, Gordon R., Excavations at Seibal, Department of Peten, Guatemala, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1975.
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    1. Davis, Kingsley, “The First Cities: How and Why Did They Arise?”, p. 9.
    2. Sjoberg, Gideon, “The Origin and Evolution of Cities,” p. 19.
    3. Lamberg-Karlovsky, C. C. and Martha Lamberg-Karlovsky, “An Early City in Iran,” p. 28.
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    26. Mangin, William, “Squatter Settlements,” p. 232.
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    28. Bose, Nirmal Kumar, “Calcutta: A Premature Metropolis,” p. 251.
    29. Davis, Kingsley, “Cities and Group Conflict,” p. 264.
    30. Taeuber, Karl E., “Residential Segregation,” p. 266.
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    1. Geschwind, Norman, “Specializations of the Human Brain,” p. 7.
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  483. Austin, Alfredo Lopez, The Rabbit on the Face of the Moon, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, 1996.
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  486. Hanks, William F. and Don S. Rice, Word and Image in Maya Culture: Explorations in Language, Writing, and Representation, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, 1989.
    1. Rice, Don S., “Historical Contexts and Interpretive Themes,” p. 2.
    2. Hanks, William F., “Word and Image in a Semiotic Perspective,” p. 8.
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  487. Tate, Carolyn E., Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992.
  488. Tate, Carolyn E., “Writing on the Face of the Moon: Women’s Products, Archetypes, and Power in Ancient Maya Civilization,” Maya File 356.
  489. Tate, Carolyn E., “An Interpretation of the Massive Offerings and Mosaic Pavements at La Venta: Testing the Application of Mixe Ethnographic Analogy at an Olmec Site,” Maya File 357.
  490. Tate, Carolyn E. and Gordon Bendersky, “Ancient Olmec Sculptors Carved the Earliest Images of the Human Fetus,” or “Olmec Sculptures of the Human Fetus: A Focus on Transformation,” or “Olmec Fetuses: Unique Sculptural Subjects in World Art,” Maya File 358.
  491. Tate, Carolyn E., La Venta’s Stone Figurines and the Olmec Body Politic,” Maya File 359.
  492. Tate, Carolyn E., “The Archaeology of Ancient Mexico and Central America: An Encyclopedia,” Maya File 360.
  493. Tate, Carolyn, “The Use of Astronomy in Political Statements at Yaxchilan, Mexico,” Maya File 230.
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  495. Shook, Edwin M. and Elayne Marquis, Secrets in Stone: Yokes, Hachas and Palmas from Southern Mesoamerica, American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, 1996.
  496. Stoneman, Milton, Easy-to-Make Wooden Sundials: Instructionas and Plans for 5 Projects, Dover, New York, 1982.
  497. Naylor, Maria, Authentic Indian Designs: 2500 Illustrations from Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Dover, New York, 1975.
  498. Grieder, Terence, Representation of Space and Form in Maya Painting on Pottery, No. 8 The University of Texas Institute of Latin American Studies Offprint Series, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1964; from American Antiquity, Volume 29, No. 4, April, 1964.
  499. Prouskouriakoff, Tatiana, Maya History, Edited by Rosemary A. Joyce, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1991.
  500. Bricker, Victoria Reifler and Patricia A. Andrews, eds., Supplement to the Handbook of Middle American Indians Volume Five: Epigraphy, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992.
    1. Bricker, Victoria A., “Introduction,” p. 1.
    2. Whittaker, Gordon, “The Zapotec Writing System,” p. 5.
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  501. Bassie-Sweet, Karen, From the Mouth of the Dark Cave: Commemorative Sculpture of the Late Classic Maya, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1991.
  502. Bassie-Sweet, Karen, At the Edge of the World: Caves and Late Classic Maya World View, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1996.
  503. Benson, Elizabeth P., ed., Mesoamerican Writing Systems: A Conference at Dumbarton Oaks, October 30th and 31st, 1971 Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collections, Washington, D. C., 1973.
    1. Nicholson, H. B., “Phoneticism in the Late Pre-Hispanic Central Mexican Writing System,” p. 1.
    2. Smith, Mary Elizabeth, “The Relationship Between Mixtec Manuscript Painting and the Mixtec Language: A Study of Some Personal Names in Codices Muro and Sanchez Solis,” p. 47.
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  504. Tagle, Silvia Gomez, Musee National D’Anthropologie, GV Editores, Mexico, 1991 (Guidebook for National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City. In French!).
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  511. Diaz, Gisele and Alan Rodgers, The Codex Borgia: A Full-Color Restoration of the Ancient Mexican Manuscript, Dover, New York, 1993.
  512. Caraway, Caren, The Mayan Design Book, Stemmer House Publishers, Inc., Owings Mills, Maryland, 1981.
  513. Fash, William L., Scribes, Warriors and Kings: The City of Copan and the Ancient Maya, Thames and Hudson, London, 1991.
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    10. Adams, Robert McC., “Ideologies: Unity and Diversity,” p. 205.
  523. Laughlin, Robert M. and Carol Karasik, Mayan Tales from Zinacantan: Dreams and Stories from the People of the Bat, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D. C., 1988.
  524. Griffin-Pierce, Trudy, Earth is My Mother, Sky is My Father: Space, Time and Astronomy in Navajo Sandpainting, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1992.
  525. Erdoes, Richard and Alfonso Ortiz, American Indian Myths and Legends, Pantheon Books, New York, 1984.
  526. Mallery, Garrick, Picture-Writing of the American Indians, Volume 1, Dover, New York, 1972.
  527. Montejo, Victor, The Bird Who Cleans the World and Other Mayan Fables, Curbstone Press, Willimantic CT, 1991.
  528. Joyce, Rosemary A., Cerro Palenque: Power and Identity on the Maya Periphery, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1991.
  529. Goetz, Delia, Sylvanus G. Morley and Adrian Recinos, Popol Vuh: The Sacred Book of the Ancient Quiche Maya, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1950.
  530. Sexton, James D., Mayan Folk Tales: Folklore from Lake Atitlan, Guatemala, Anchor Books, New York, 1992.
  531. Chase, Diane Z. and Arlen F. Chase, Mesoamerican Elites: An Archaeological Assessment, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1992.
    1. Chase, Arlen F. and Diane Z. Chase, “Mesoamerican Elites: Assumptions, Definitions, and Models,” p. 3.
    2. Hirth, Kenneth, “Interregional Exchange as Elite Behavior: An Evolutionary Perspective,” p. 18.
    3. Chase, Arlen F., “Elites and the Changing Organization of Classic Maya Society,” p. 30.
    4. Haviland, William A. and Hattula Moholy-Nagy, “Distinguishing the High and Mighty from the Hoi Poiloi at Tikal, Guatemala,” p. 50.
    5. Pendergast, David M., “Noblesse Oblige: The Elites of Altun Hu and Lamanai, Belize,” p. 61.
    6. Tourtellot, Gair, Jeremy A. Sabloff and Kelli Carmean, “ ‘Will the Real Elites Please Stand Up?’: An Archaeological Assessment of Maya Elite Behavior in the Terminal Classic Period,” p. 80.
    7. Freidel, David A., “Children of the First Father’s Skull: Terminal Classic Warfare in the Northern Maya Lowlands and the Transformation of Kingship and Elite Hierarchies,” p. 99.
    8. Chase, Diane Z., “Postclassic Maya Elites: Ethnohistory and Archaeology,” p. 118.
    9. Webster, David, “Maya Elites: The Perspective from Copan,” p. 135.
    10. Henderson, John S., “Elites and Ethnicity along the Southeastern Fringe of Mesoamerica,” p. 157.
    11. Fox, John W., Dwight T. Wallace and Kenneth L. Brown, “The Emergence of the Quiche Elite: The Putun-Palenque Connection,” p. 169.
    12. Grove, David C. and Susan D. Gillespie, “Archaeological Indicators of Formative Period Elites: A Perspective from Central Mexico,” p. 191.
    13. Cowgill, George L., “Social Differentiation at Teotihuacan,” p. 206.
    14. Marcus, Joyce, “Royal Families, Royal Texts: Examples from the Zapotec and Maya,” p. 221.
    15. Charlton, Thomas H. and Deborah L. Nichols, “Late Postclassic and Colonial Period Elites at Otumba, Mexico: The Archaeological Dimensions,” p. 242.
    16. Kowaleski, Stephen A., Gary M. Feinman and Laura Finsten, “The Elite and Assessment of Social Stratification in Mesoamerican Archaeology,” p. 259.
    17. Sanders, William T., “Ranking and Stratication in Prehispanic Mesoamerica,” p. 278.
    18. Marcus, George E., “The Concern with Elites in Archaeological Reconstructions: Mesoamerican Materials,” p. 292.
    19. Chase, Diane Z. and Arlen F. Chase, “An Archaeological Assessment of Mesoamerican Elites,” p. 303.
  532. Ingle, Marjorie, Mayan Revival Style: Art Deco Mayan Fantasy, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1984.
  533. Walter, Christopher, ed., Astronomy Before the Telescope, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 1996.
    1. Ruggles, Clive, “Archaeoastronomy in Europe,” p. 15.
    2. Wells, Ronald A., “Astronomy in Egypt,” p. 28.
    3. Britton, John and Christopher Walker, “Astronomy and Astrology in Mesopotamia,” p. 42.
    4. Toomer, G. J., “Ptolemy and his Greek Predecessors,” p. 68.
    5. Potter, T. W., “Astronomy in Etruria and Rome,” p. 92.
    6. Jones, Alexander, “Later Greek and Byzantine Astronomy,” p. 98.
    7. Field, J. V., “European Astronomy in the First Millennium: The Archaeological Record,” p. 110.
    8. Pingree, David, “Astronomy in India,” p. 123.
    9. King, David A., “Islamic Astronomy,” p. 143.
    10. Pedersen, Olaf, “European Astronomy in the Middle Ages,” p. 175.
    11. Swerdlow, N. M., “Astronomy in the Renaissance,” p. 187.
    12. Turner, G. L’E., “Later Medieval and Renaissance Instruments,” p. 231.
    13. Ronan, Colin, “Astronomy in China, Korea and Japan,” p. 245.
    14. Aveni, Anthony F., “Astronomy in the Americas,” p. 269.
    15. Warner, Brian, “Traditional Astronomical Knowledge in Africa,” p. 304.
    16. Orchiston, Wayne, “Australian Aboriginal, Polynesian and Maori Astronomy,” p. 318.
    17. Stephenson, F. Richard, “Modern Uses of Ancient Astronomy,” p. 329.
  534. Scarborough, Vernon L. and David R. Wilcox, eds., The Mesoamerican Ballgame, University of Arizona Press, Tucscon, 1991.
    1. Santley, Robert S., Michael J. Berman and Rani T. Alexander, “The Politicization of the Mesoamerican Ballgame and Its Implications for the Interpretation of the Distribution of Ballcourts in Central Mexico,” p. 3.
    2. Kowalewski, Stephen A., Gary M. Feinman, Laura Finsten and Richard E. Blanton, “Pre-Hispanic Ballcourts from the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico,” p. 25.
    3. Wilkerson, S. Jeffrey K., “And Then They Were Sacrificed: The Ritual Ballgame of Northeastern Mesoamerica Through Time and Space,” p. 45.
    4. Weigand, Phil C., “The Western Mesoamerican Tlachco: A Two-Thousand Year Perspective,” p. 73.
    5. Kelley, J. Charles, “The Known Archaeological Ballcourts of Durango and Zacatecas, Mexico,” p. 87.
    6. Wilcox, David R., “The Mesoamerican Ballgame in the American Southwest,” p. 101.
    7. Scarborough, Vernon L., “Courting in the Southern Maya Lowlands: A Study in Pre-Hispanic Ballgame Architecture,” p. 129.
    8. Kurjack, Edward B., Ruben Maldonado C. and Merle Green Robertson, “Ballcourts of the Northern Maya Lowlands,” p. 145.
    9. Taladoire, Eric and Benoit Colsenet, “ ‘Bois Ton Sang, Beaumanoir’: The Political and Conflictual Aspects of the Ballgame in the Northern Chiapas Area,” p. 161.
    10. Agrinier, Pierre, “The Ballcourts of Southern Chiapas, Mexico,” p. 175.
    11. Parsons, Lee A., “The Ballgame in the Southern Pacific Coast Cotzumalhuapa Region and Its Impact on Kaminaljuyu During the Middle Classic,” p. 195.
    12. Fox, John W., “The Lords of Light Versus the Lords of Dark: The Postclassic Highland Maya Ballgame,” p. 213.
    13. Ekholm, Susanna M., “Ceramic Figurines and the Mesoamerican Ballgame,” p. 241.
    14. Cohodas, Marvin, “Ballgame Imagery of the Maya Lowlands: History and Iconography,” p. 251.
    15. Schele, Linda and David A. Freidel, “The Courts of Creation: Ballcourts, Ballgames, and Portals to the Maya Otherworld,” p. 289.
    16. Gillespie, Susan D., “Ballgames and Boundaries,” p. 317.
  535. Dershowitz, Nachum and Edward M. Reingold, Calendrical Calculations, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997.
  536. Arguelles, Jose, The Mayan Factor: Path Beyond Technology, Bear & Company, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1987 (Rather amazing crackpottery).
  537. Borst, Arno, The Ordering of Time: From the Ancient Computus to the Modern Computer, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1993.
  538. Zauzich, Karl-Theodor, Hieroglyphs without Mystery: An Introduction to Ancient Egyptian Writing, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1992.
  539. Graham, Ian, The Art of Maya Hieroglyphic Writing: January 28—March 28, 1971, An Exhibition, Harvard University Printing Office, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1971.
  540. Davies, W. V., Egyptian Hieroglyphs, University of California Press, Berkeley, 1987.
  541. Gould, Stephen Jay, Time’s Arrow, Time’s Cycle: Myth and Metaphor in the Discovery of Geological Time, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1987.
  542. O’Reilly, James and Larry Habegger, eds., Travelers’ Tales, O’Reilly & Associates, Inc., Sebastopol, California, 1994.
    1. Guillermoprieto, Alma, “Serenading the Future,” p. 3. Simon, Joel, “Crossing the Linguistic Frontera,” p. 15.
    2. Schueler, Donald G., “Temple of the Jaguar,” p. 23.
    3. Greenwald, Jeff, “Welcoming the Spirits on Janitzio Island,” p. 31.
    4. Turner, Frederick, “A Routine Night in Veracruz,” p. 43.
    5. Bernthal, Ron, “Bays of Huanalco,” p. 47.
    6. Canby, Peter, “A Walking Witch,” p. 53.
    7. Fuentes, Carlos, “Where Gods Abide,” p. 59.
    8. Heller, Peter, “Wild Baja,” p. 67.
    9. Barbash, Shepard, “Machete Dream Carvers,” p. 75.
    10. Freidel, David, “Rainmaker,” p. 85.
    11. Riding, Alan, “Para Servirle,” p. 95.
    12. Conrad, Jim, “Pig in the Rain,” p. 97.
    13. Bowden, Charles, “The Wedding and the Land,” p. 101.
    14. Schultheis, Rob, “Into Copper Canyon,” p. 113.
    15. Ferrin, Lynn, “I’ve Still Got Mexico,” p. 125.
    16. Cole, Richard A., “Sometimes a Shave,” p. 133.
    17. DePalma, Anthony, “In Nahuatl it Means Butterfly,” p. 137.
    18. Goben, Ronald D., “The Flamingos of Celestun,” p. 141.
    19. Turner, Frederick, “Road Warrior,” p. 145.
    20. Rosenbaum, Jenny Lenore, “The Hills of Guanajuato,” p. 149.
    21. Pucci, Carol, “Riding the Rails in Sonora,” 155.
    22. Doggett, Scott, “Diving with the Hammerheads,” 159.
    23. McDowell, Bart, “Golden Guadalajara,” p. 163.
    24. Adams, Alice, “Finding Frida Kahlo,” p. 171.
    25. Gregory, Joyce, “Se Habla Espanol,” p. 179.
    26. Hamill, Pete, “A Healing Place,” p. 185.
    27. Bloom, Richard, “The Underground World of the Yucatan,” p. 195.
    28. Greenwald, Jeff, “Getting Wired in Oaxaca,” p. 201.
    29. Glenn, Reed, “Up the Volcano,” p. 207.
    30. Conover, Ted, “In the Land of Avocados,” p. 215.
    31. Golden, Tim, “Dancing the Goat,” p. 231.
    32. Sterling, Richard, “Murderer’s Eggs,” p. 235.
    33. Morris, Mary, “The Road to San Miguel,” p. 245.
    34. Starkell, Don, “Mad Dogs and Canadians,” p. 253.
    35. Shames, Germaine W., “Mexican Mating Calls,” p. 267.
    36. Bruns, Rebecca, “City in the Mist,” p. 271.
    37. Cox, Robert B., “City Under Grass,” 283.
    38. Canter, Carol, “Time Travel with My Daughter,” p. 287.
    39. Schueler, Donald G., “The World Tree and the Praying Girl,” p. 293.
    40. Canby, Peter, “Lost in the Lacandon Jungle,” p. 303.
    41. Hamill, Pete, “Where the Air was Clear,” p. 327.
    42. Simon, Kate, “La Bruja and the Mushroom,” p. 341.
    43. Schueler, Donald G., “Roberto and the Permanent Revolution,” p. 353.
    44. Laufer, Peter, “Beans or Luxury in a Tijuana Jail,” p. 359.
    45. Rodriguez, Richard, “The Evolution of La Frontera,” p. 367.
    46. Langewiesche, William, “The Border,” p. 371.
    47. Bowden, Charles, “Vaya con Dios,” p. 381.
  543. Brennan, Martin, The Stones of Time: Calendars, Sundials, and Stone Chambers of Ancient Ireland, Inner Traditions International, Rochester, Vermont, 1994.
  544. McAnany, Patricia A., Living with the Ancestors: Kinship and Kingship in Ancient Maya Society, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1995.
  545. Ehrich, Robert W., ed., Relative Chronologies in Old World Archaeology, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1954 (Has a nice bookplate: picture here).
    1. Kantor, Helene J., “The Chronology of Egypt and Its Correlation with That of Other Parts of the Near East in the Periods before the Last Bronze Age,” p. 1.
    2. Albright, W. F., “A Survey of the Archaeological Chronology of Palestine from Neolithic to Middle Bronze,” p. 28.
    3. Braidwood, Robert J., “A Tentative Relative Chronology of Syria from the Terminal Food-Gathering Stage to ca. 2000 B.C. (Based on the Amouq Sequence),” p. 34.
    4. Perkins, Ann, “The Relative Chronology of Mesopotamia,” p. 42.
    5. McCown, Donald E., “The Relative Stratigraphy and Chronology of Iran,” p. 56.
    6. Goldman, Betty, “The Relative Chronology of Southeastern Anatolia,” p. 69.
    7. Weinberg, Saul S., “The Relative Chronology of the Aegean in the Neolithic Period and the Early Bronze Age,” p. 86.
    8. Ehrich, Robert W., “The Relative Chronology of Southeastern and Central Europe in the Neolithic Period,” p. 108.
    9. Ward, Lauriston, “The Relative Chronology of China Through the Han Period,” p. 130.
  546. Ginzel, F. K., Handbuch der Mathematischen und Technischen Chronologie: Das Zeitrechnunswesen der Volker, Volume I: Zeitrechnung der Babylonier, Aegypter, Mohammedaner, Perser, Inder, Sudostasiaten, Chinesen, Japaner und Zentralamerikaner, J. C. Hinrich’sche Buchhandlung, Leipzig, 1906.
  547. Ginzel, F. K., Handbuch der Mathematischen und Technischen Chronologie: Das Zeitrechnunswesen der Volker, Volume II: Zeitrechnung der Juden, der Naturvolker, der Romer und Griechen, sowie Nachtrage zum I. Bande, J. C. Hinrich’sche Buchhandlung, Leipzig, 1911.
  548. Ginzel, F. K., Handbuch der Mathematischen und Technischen Chronologie: Das Zeitrechnunswesen der Volker, Volume III: Zeitrechnung der Makedonier, Kleinasier und Syrer, der Gemanen un Kelten, des Mittelalters, der Byzantiner (und Russen), Armenier, Kopten, Abessinier, Zeitrechnung der Neueren Zeit, sowie Nachtrage zu den Drie Banden, J. C. Hinrich’sche Buchhandlung, Leipzig, 1914.
  549. Manning-Schwarta, Lynda D., The Pre-Colombian Astronomy Workbook, Privately Published by the Author, Austin, Texas, 1996.
  550. Press, William H., Saul A. Teukolsky, William T. Vetterling and Brian P. Flannery, Numerical Recipes in C: The Art of Scientific Computing, Second Edition, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1992 (First Edition published 1988).
  551. Vetterling, William T., Saul A. Teukolsky, William H. Press and Brian P. Flannery, Numerical Recipes: Example Book (C), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1988.
  552. Schele, Linda, A Palenque Triad: A Compilation of the Hieroglyph Inscriptions, Translations, and Commentary that Appear in the Notebooks of the 1986, 1987, and 1988 Workshops on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing at the University of Texas at Austin, Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, 1986, 1987, 1988.
  553. Schele, Linda, “A Preliminary Commentary on the Tablets of the Temple of Inscriptions at Palenque, Chiapas,” Maya File 192.
  554. Schele, Linda, “History of Katun 13,” Maya File 189.
  555. Schele, Linda, “Brotherhood in Ancient Maya Kingship,” Maya File 188.
  556. Schele, Linda and Peter Mathews, “Parentage Statements in Classic Maya Inscriptions,” Maya File 209.
  557. Schele, Linda, et al., Correspondence: January 1974-June 1974, Maya File 204.
  558. Graham, Ian, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 1, Introduction to the Corpus, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1975.
  559. Graham, Ian, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 2, Part 1, Naranjo, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1975.
  560. Graham, Ian, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 2, Part 2, Naranjo, Chunhuitz, Xunantunich, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1978.
  561. Graham, Ian, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 2, Part 3, Ixkun, Ucanal, Ixtutz, Naranjo, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1980.
  562. Graham, Ian, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 3, Part 2, Yaxchilan, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1979.
  563. von Euw, Eric, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 4, Part 1, Itzimte, Pixoy, Tzum, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1977.
  564. von Euw, Eric, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 5, Part 1, Xultun, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1978.
  565. von Euw, Eric and Ian Graham, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 5, Part 2, Xultun, La Honradez, Uaxactun, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1984.
  566. Graham, Ian, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 5, Part 3, Uaxactun, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1986.
  567. Mathews, Peter, Corpus of Maya Hieroglphic Inscriptions: Volume 6, Part 1, Tonina, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1983.
  568. Fowler, William R. Jr., ed., Ancient Mesoamerica, Volume 8, No. 1, Spring 1997.
    1. Haviland, William A., “The Rise and Fall of Sexual Inequality: Death and Gender at Tikal, Guatemala,” p. 1.
    2. Danforth, Marie Elaine, Keith P. Jacobi and Mark Nathan Cohen, “Gender and Health Among the Colonial Maya of Tipu, Belize,” p. 13.
    3. de Montmollin, Olivier, “A Regional Study of Classic Maya Ballcourts from the Upper Grijalva Basin, Chiapas, Mexico,” p. 23.
    4. Webster, David, Nancy Gonlin and Payson Sheets, “Copan and Ceren: Two Perspectives on Ancient Mesoamerican Households,” p. 43.
    5. Lentz, David L., Carlos R. Ramirez and Bronson W. Griscom, “Formative-Period Subsistence and Forest-Product Extraction at the Yarumela Site, Honduras,” p. 63.
    6. Healan, Dan M., “Pre-Hispanic Quarrying in the Ucarea-Zinapecuaro Obsidian Source Area,” p. 77.
    7. Ford, Anabel, Fred Stross, Frank Asaro and Helen V. Michel, “Obsidian Procurement and Distribution in the Tikal-Yaxha Intersite Area of the Central Maya Lowlands,” p. 101.
    8. Clark, John E. and Douglas Donne Bryant, “A Technological Typology of Prismatic Blades and Debitage from Ojo de Agua, Chiapas, Mexico,” p. 111.
    9. Clark, John E., “Prismatic Blademaking, Craftsmanship, and Production: An Analysis of Obsidian Refuse from Ojo de Agua, Chiapas, Mexico,” p. 137.
  569. Fowler, William R. Jr., ed., Ancient Mesoamerica, Volume 8, No. 2, Fall 1997.
    1. Nichols, Deborah L. and Jeffrey R. Parsons, “In Memoriam: Mary G. Hodge: 1946-1998,” p. 161.
    2. Mock, Shirley Boteler, “Monkey Business at Northern River Lagoon: A Coastal-Inland Interaction Sphere in Northern Belize,” p. 165.
    3. Milbrath, Susan, “Decapitated Lunar Goddesses in Aztec Art, Myth and Ritual,” p. 185.
    4. Demarest, Arthur A., “The Vanderbilt Petexbatun Regional Archaeological Project 1989-1994: Overview, History, and Magor Results of a Multidisciplinary Study of the Classic Maya Collapse,” p. 209.
    5. O’Mansky, Matt and Claudia Wolley, Dirk Van Tuerenhout, Takeshi Inomata, Joel Palka, Hector Escobedo, “Classic Maya Defensive Systems and Warfare in the Petexbatun Region: Archaeological Evidence and Interpretations,” p. 229.
    6. Dunning, Nicholas and Timothy Beach, David Rue, “The Paleoecology and Ancient Settlement of the Petexbatun Region, Guatemala,” p. 255.
    7. Wright, Lori E., “Biological Perspectives on the Collapse of the Pasion Maya,” p. 267.
    8. Folas, Antonia E. and Ronald L. Bishop, “Changing Ceramic Production and Exchange in the Petexbatun Region, Guatemala: Reconsidering the Classic Maya Collapse,” p. 275.
    9. Palka, Joel W., “Reconstructing Classic Maya Socioeconomic Differentiation and the Collapse at Dos Pilas, Peten, Guatemala,” p. 293.
    10. Escobedo, Hector, “Arroyo de Piedra: Sociopolitical Dynamics of a Secondary Center in the Petexbatun Region,” p. 307.
    11. Valdes, Juan Antonio, “Tamarindito: Archaeology and Regional Politics in the Petexbatun Region,” p. 321.
    12. Inomata, Takeshi, “The Last Day of a Fortified Classic Maya Center: Archaeological Investigations at Aguateca, Guatemala,” p. 337.
    13. Brady, James E. and Ann Scott, Allan Cobb, Irma Rodas, John Fogarty, Monica Urquizu Sanchez, “Glimpses of the Dark Side of the Petexbatun Project: The Petexbatun Regional Cave Survey,” p. 353.
  570. Fowler, William R. Jr., ed., Ancient Mesoamerica, Volume 9, No. 1, Spring 1998.
    1. Dahlin, Brule H. and Anthony P. Andrews, Timothy Beach, Clara Bezanilla, Patrice Farrell, Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, Valerie McCormick, “Punta Canbalam in Context: A Peripatetic Coastal Site in Northwest Campeche, Mexico,” p. 1.
    2. Brady, James E. and Joseph W. Ball, Ronald L. Bishop, Cuncan C. Pring, Norman Hammond, Rupert A. Housley, “The Lowland Maya ‘Protoclassic’: A Reconsideration of its Nature and Significance,” p. 17.
    3. Alexander, Rani T., “Community Organization in the Parroquia de Yaxcaba, Yucatan, Mexico, 1750-1847: Implications for Household Adaptation Within a Changing Colonial Economy,” p. 39.
    4. Kosakowsky, Laura J. and Duncan C. Pring, “The Ceramics of Cuello, Belize: A New Evaluation,” p. 55.
    5. Lesure, Richard G., “Refining an Early Formative Ceramic Sequence from the Chiapas Coast of Mexico,” p. 67.
    6. Whitmore, Thomas M. and Barbara J. Williams, “Famine Vulnerability in the Contact-Era Basin of Mexico: A Simulation,” p. 83.
    7. Ardren, Traci and William R. Fowler, Jr., “Recent Chronological Research in Northern Yucatan: Introduction,” p. 99.
    8. Bey, George J. III and Tara M. Bond, William M. Ringle, Craig A. Hanson, Charles W. Houck, Carlos Peraza Lope, “The Ceramic Chronology of Ek Balam, Yucatan Mexico,” p. 101.
    9. Kepecs, Susan, “Diachronic Ceramic Evidence and its Social Implications in the Chikinchel Region, Northeast Yucatan, Mexico,” p. 121.
    10. Smyth, Michael P., “Before the Florescence: Chronological Reconstructions at Chac II, Yucatan, Mexico,” p. 137.
    11. Anderson, Patricia K., “Yula, Yucatan, Mexico: Terminal Classic Maya Ceramic Chronology for the Chichen Itza Area,” p. 151.
    12. Suhler, Charles and Traci Ardren, David Johnstone, “The Chronology of Yaxuna: Evidence from Excavation and Ceramics,” p. 167.
  571. Fowler, William R. Jr., ed., Ancient Mesoamerica, Volume 9, No. 2, Fall 1998.
    1. Ringle, William M., Tomas Gallareta Negron and George J. Bey III, “The Return of Quetzalcoatl: Evidence for the Spread of a World Religion During the Epiclassic Period,” p. 183.
    2. Smyth, Michael P., Jose Ligorred Perramon, David Ortegon Zapata and Pat Farrell, “An Early Classic Center in the Puuc Region: New Data from Chac II, Yucatan, Mexico,” p. 233.
    3. Carmean, Kelli, “Leadership at Sayil: A Study of Political and Religious Decentralization,” p. 259.
    4. Fitzsimmons, James L., “Classic Maya Mortuary Anniversaries at Piedras Negras, Guatemala,” p. 271.
    5. Gillespie, Susan D. and Rosemary A. Joyce, “Deity Relationships in Mesoamerican Cosmologies: The Case of the Maya God L,” p. 279.
    6. Middleton, William D., Gary M. Feinman and Guillermo Molina Villagas, “Tomb Use and Reuse in Oaxaca, Mexico,” p. 297.
    7. Blomster, Jeffrey P., “Context, Cult and Early Formative Period Public Ritual in the Mixteca Alta: Analysis of a Hollow-Baby Figurine from Etlatongo, Oaxaca,” p. 327.
    8. Dixon, Boyd, George Hasemann, Pastor Gomez, James Brady and Marilyn Beaudry-Corbett, “Multiethnicity or Multiple Enigma: Archaeological Survey and Cave Exploration in the Rio Talgua Drainage, Honduras,” p. 341.
  572. Fowler, William R. Jr., ed., Ancient Mesoamerica, Volume 10, No. 1, Spring 1999.
    1. Dixon, Boyd, “In Memoriam: George Ernest Hasemann 1944-1998,” p. 1
    2. Sharer, Robert J., Lou P. Traxler, David W. Sedat, Ellen E. Bell, Marcello A. Canuto and Christopher Powell, “Early Classic Architecture Beneath the Copan Acropolis: A Research Update,” p. 3.
    3. Rice, Prudence M., “Rethinking Classic Lowland Maya Pottery Censers,” p. 25.
    4. Masson, Marilyn Andrews, “Postclassic Maya Ritual at Laguna de On Island, Belize,” p. 51.
    5. Headrick, Annabeth, “The Street of the Dead . It Really Was: Mortuary Bundles at Teotihuacan,” p. 69.
    6. Aveni, Anthony F. and Edward E. Calnek, “Astronomical Considerations in the Aztec Expression of History: Eclipse Data,” p. 87.
    7. Batten, David C., “Horse Power: Wheat, Oats, Maize, and the Supply of Cities,” p. 99.
    8. Cabrero G., Ma. Teresa, “La cultura bolanos y su tradicion funeraria,” p. 105.
    9. Aizpurua, Ilean Isel Isaza and Patricia A. McAnany, “Adornment and Identity: SHell Ornaments from Formative K’axob,” p. 117.
    10. McAnany, Patricia A. Rebecca Storey and Angela K. Lockard, “Mortuary Ritual and Family Politics at Formative and Early Classic K’axob, Belize,” p. 129
    11. McAnany, Patricia A. and Sandra L. Lopez Varela, “Re-creating the Formative Maya Village of K’axob: Chronology, Ceramic Complexes, and Ancestors in Architectural Context,” p. 147.
  573. Fowler, William R. Jr., ed., Ancient Mesoamerica, Volume 11, No. 1, Spring 2000.
    1. Klein, Cecilia F., “The Devil and the Skirt:  An Iconographic Inquiry into the Pre-Hispanic Nature of the Tzitzimime,” p. 1.
    2. Berres, Thomas E., “Climatic Change and Lacustrine Resources at the Period of Initial Aztec Development,” p. 27.
    3. McCafferty, Sharisse D. and Geoffrey G. McCafferty, “Textile Production in Postclassic Cholula, Mexico,” p. 39.
    4. Dakin, Karen and Soren Wichmann, “Cacao and Chocolate:  A Uta-Aztecan Perspective,” p. 55.
    5. Druc, Isabelle C., “Ceramic Production in San Marcos Acteopan, Puebla, Mexico,” p. 77.
    6. Maxwell, David, “Beyond Maritime Symbolism:  Toxic Marine Objects from Ritual Contexts at Tikal,” p. 91.
    7. Reents-Budet, Dorie, Ronald L. Bishop, Jennifer T. Taschek and Joseph W. Ball, “Out of the Palace Dumps:  Ceramic Production and Use at Buenavista del Cayo,” p. 99.
    8. Vail, Gabrielle, “Pre-Hispanic Maya Religion:  Conceptions of Divinity in the Postclassic Maya Codices,” p. 123.
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    11. Demarest, Arthur A., “Political Evolution in the Maya Borderlands: The Salvadoran Frontier,” p. 335.
    12. Willey, Gordon A., “The Southeast Classic Maya Zone: A Summary,” p. 395.
  715. Whittington, Stephen L. and David M. Reed, eds, Bones of the Maya: Studies of Ancient Skeletons, Smithsonian, Washington DC, 1997.
    1. Webster, David, “Studying Maya Burials,” p. 3.
    2. Chase, Diane Z., “Southern Lowland Maya Archaeology and Human Skeletal Remains Interpretations from Caracol (Belize), Santa Rita Corozal (Belize), and Tayasal (Guatemala),” p. 15.
    3. Saul, Julie Mather and Frank P. Saul, “The Preclassic Skeletons from Cuello,” p. 28.
    4. Marquez, Lourdes and Adres del Angel, “Height Among Prehispanic Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula: A Reconsideration,” p. 51.
    5. Massey, Virginia K. and D. Gentry Steele, “A Maya Skull Pit from the Terminal Classic Period, Colha, Belize,” p. 62.
    6. Cohen, Mark N., Kathleen O’Connor, Marie Elaine Danforth, Keith P. Jacobi and Carl Armstrong, “Archaeology and Osteology of the Tipu Site,” p. 78.
    7. Havill, Lorena M., Diane M. Warren, Keith P. Jacobi, Karen D. Gettelman, Della Collins Cook and K. Anne Pyburn, “Late Postclassic Tooth Filing at Chau Hiix and Tipu, Belize,” p. 89.
    8. Olivares, Nora M. Lopez, “Cultural Odontology: Dental Alterations from Peten, Guatemala,” p. 105.
    9. Storey, Rebecca, “Individual Frailty, Children of Privilege, and Stress in Late Classic Copan,” p. 116.
    10. Danforth, Marie Elaine, “Late Classic Maya Health Patterns: Evidence from Enamel Microdefects,” p. 127.
    11. Jacobi, Keith P., “Dental Genetic Structuring of a Colonial Maya Cemetery, Tipu, Belize,” p. 138.
    12. Whittington, Stephen L. and David M. Reed, “Commoner Diet at Copan: Insights from Stable Isotopes and Porotic Hyperostosis,” p. 157.
    13. White, Christine, “Ancient Diet at Lamanai and Pachiton: Implications for the Ecological Model,” p. 171.
    14. Wright, Lori E., “Ecology or Society? Paleodiet and The Collaps of the Passion Maya,” p. 181.
    15. Gerry, John P. and Harold W. Krueger, “Regional Diversity in Classic Maya Diets,” p. 196.
    16. Merriwether, D. Andrew, David M. Reed and Robert E. Ferrell, “Ancient and Contemporary Mitochondrial DNA Variation in the Maya,” p. 208.
    17. Buikstra, Jane E., “Studying Maya Bioarchaeology,” p. 221.
  716. Kumatzim Wuj Jun: Codice de Dresde, Cholsamaj, Guatemala, 1999. The Dresden Codex in Facsimile.
  717. Gossen, Gary H. Telling Maya Tales: Tzotzil Identities in Modern Mexico, Routledge, New York, 1999.
  718. Robinson, Andrew, The Story of Writing: Alphabets, Hieroglyphs & Pictograms, Thames & Hudson, London, 1995.
  719. McGlone, Bill, Phil Leonard and Ted Barker, Archaeoastronomy of Southeast Colorado and the Oklahoma Panhandle, Mithras, Kamas UT, 1999.
  720. Caso, Alfonso, The Aztecs: People of the Sun, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1958.
  721. Wisdom, Charles, “Chorti-English Dictionary,” 1950, Maya File 1999.220.
  722. Jones, Tom & Carolyn Jones, U Mut Maya III: A collection of reports from attendants of the VII Advanced Seminar on Maya Hieroglyphic Writing Held at the University of Texas at Austin, March 1989, U Mut Maya, Arcata, CA, 1990.
    1. Wanyerka, Phil, “The East Panel of the Temple of the Inscriptions, Palenque,” p. 1.
    2. Frumker, Bruce, Martha Mentch, Dennis Tedlock and Loa Traxler, “An Oral Recitation of the Tablet of the Cross,” p. 5.
    3. Frumker, Bruce, “Remarks on the Temple of the Cross,” p. 7.
    4. Tedlock, Dennis, “Drums, Egrets, and the Mother of the Gods: Remarks on the Tablet of the Cross at Palenque,” p. 13.
    5. Hoffman, Patricia, “The Temple of the Sun at Palenque,” p. 15.
    6. Langley, J.C., “Some Notes on Copan Stela 6,” p. 17.
    7. Harrison, William F., “The Role of Gods 7 and 9 in the Iconography and Epigraphy of Stela D at Copan,” p. 25.
    8. Harris, John F., “The Inscriptions of Shield Jaguar I of Yaxchilan,” p. 39.
    9. Brisko, Jo Ann Roman, “Two Yaxchilan Mysteries,” p. 65.
    10. Brisko, Jo Ann Roman, “Yaxchilan Structure 44 and the Hieroglyphic Stairway,” p. 71.
    11. Jones, Tom, “Empowering the Flint and Shield: A Motive for the Vision Serpent Rite of Yaxchilan Structure 23,” p. 83.
    12. Jones, Tom, Carolyn Jones and Randa Marhenke, “Blood Cousins: The Xok-Balam Connection at Yaxchilan.” p. 99.
    13. Jones, Tom, “PAY: A Proposed Reading for the ’God N’ Verb,” p. 115.
    14. Harris, John F., “The Inscription on Stela 18 of Yaxchilan,” p. 121.
    15. Montgomery, John, “A Glyph for Jaguar Paw on Piedras Negras Throne I,” p. 135.
    16. Montgomery, John, “A Note on the Date of Piedras Negras Lintel 3,” p. 139.
    17. Montgomery, John, “Observations on Name Clauses at Chichen Itza, Part I,” p. 141.
    18. Walker, Debra Selsor, “The Primary Standard Sequence on a Sample of Maya Vessels: Some Conclusions of the 1989 PSS Ceramics Group,” p. 147.
    19. Grube, Nikolai and Barbara MacLeod, “The Wing that Doesn’t Fly: Problems and Possibilities Concerning the Reading of the ‘Wing’ Sign,” p. 167.
    20. Montgomery, John, “Drawings of Maya Monuments and Inscriptions,” p. 179.
  723. Jones, Tom & Carolyn Jones, U Mut Maya IV: A collection of reports from attendants of the Xth and XIth Advanced Seminars held at the University of Texas at Austin March 12-17, 1990, March 11-16, 1991, U Mut Maya, Arcata, CA, 1992.
    1. Brisko, Jo Ann Roman, “The Mystery Woman of Naranjo,” p. 1.
    2. Brisko, Jo Ann Roman, “The Puzzle of the Sibling’s Wife,” p. 9.
    3. Crumley, Laura Lee, “Peering Through Time: A Reading of Naranjo Altar 1,” p. 13.
    4. Christie-Schults, Jessica Joyce, “The Hieroglyphic Stairway of Naranjo: Matching Some Pieces of the Puzzle,” p. 31.
    5. Frumker, Bruce, “Curl Snout and the 4th Lord of the Night,” p. 37.
    6. Jones, Tom, “Two-Armed Sky and the G-Glyph of Quirigua Stela E,” p. 41.
    7. Alexander, Helen, “Celestial Links to the Ancestors: A Pattern Analysis of Celestial Events on Twelve Dates Recorded on Tikal Stela 31,” p. 48.
    8. Henrickson, Joan and The Middle Tikal Group, “A Review of the Enigmas of K’an Boar,” p. 61.
    9. Urban, Patricia and The Middle Tikal Group, “A Partial Solution to the Dating Problem of Tikal Stela 10,” p. 69.
    10. Bardsley, Sandy and The Middle Tikal Group, “So Many Kings . So Few Katuns: The Middle Era of Tikal’s History,” p. 76.
    11. Paisa, Marina Besada, Michel Davoust and Michel Quenon, “A New Phonetic Reading of the Inscription on Lintel 3 of Tikal Temple 1,” p. 87.
    12. Jones, Carolyn and Cheyenne Spetzler, “Where Have All the Fathers Gone?: An Analysis of Site Q Altar 1,” p. 104.
    13. Stross, Brian, “Genital Iconography in Landa’s Alphabet,” p. 117.
    14. Taylor, Dicey, “Toponyms for Plazas in Maya Cities,” p. 127.
    15. Jones, Tom, “Evidence for the CH’AK Reading of the ’Axe-Verb’ as Found in the Madric Codex,” p. 133.
    16. Spetzler, Cheyenne and Carolyn Jones, “The Caracol Emblem Glyph,” p. 143.
    17. Harris, John, “Summary of Caracol Dates and Astronomy,” p. 149.
    18. Wren, Linnea and Lynn Foster, “Familial and Titular Patterns in the Inscriptions of Chichen Itza,” p. 161.
    19. Jones, Tom and Carolyn Jones, “The Xok-Balam Connection Revisited“ A Re-Examination of the Text,” p. 169.
    20. Henrickson, Joan, “Yaxun Balam of Yaxchilan: His ’Count of Captives’ Title and Prisoner Ah Uk,” p. 201.
    21. Wald, Robert F., “The Inheritance of Shield Jaguar: The Program of Structure 44,” p. 209.
    22. Caruso, Josie, “The Capture Record at Yaxchilan,” p. 243.
    23. Stross, Brian, “Earflare in a Classic Maya Name,” p. 275.
    24. Montgomery, John, “Drawings of Maya Monuments and Inscriptions,” p. 283.
  724. Jones, Carolyn & Tom Jones, U Mut Maya V: A collection of reports from attendants of the Xth and XIth Advanced Seminars held at the University of Texas at Austin March 16-21, 1992, March 15-20, 1993, U Mut Maya, Arcata, CA, 1994.
    1. Marhenke, Randa, “Landa Revisited,” p. 1.
    2. Caruso, Josie, “Methodology Used by the Chilam Balam Group,” p. 13.
    3. Stross, Brian, “A Maya Iconographic ’Literary’ Convention,” p. 21.
    4. Barhart, Ed, “The Pakal - GI Connection,” p. 30.
    5. Bowen, Sharon and Lloyd Anderson, “The Palenque Emblem Bird MAT and MATAWIL,” p. 37.
    6. Marhenke, Randa, “Ah Sul, The Player,” p. 73.
    7. Hoppan, Jean-Michel, “Nuevos Datos Sobre Las Inscripciones de Comalcalco,” p. 78.
    8. Jones, Tom and Cheyenne Spetzler, “A Phonetic Reading for the Bonampak Emblem Glyph,” p. 87.
    9. Davoust, Michel, trans. Michel Quenon, “A New Phonetic Reading of the Nominal Glyphs for the First Yaxchilan Rulers and their Guests,” p. 109.
    10. Jones, Tom and Carolyn Jones, “Yaxchilan’s Hok’ Balam: Uncle or Brother?” p. 133.
    11. Kahn, Anna Lee, “The Icon of Woman in Maya Vessel Painting,” p. 140.
    12. Stross, Brian, “Maya Creation: A Shamanic Perspective,” p. 159.
    13. Wren, Linnea, Ruth Krochok, Erik Boot, Lynn Foster, Peter Keeler, Rex Koontz and Walter Wakefield, “Maya Creation and Re-Creation in the Art, Architecture and Inscriptions of Chichen Itza,” p. 171.
    14. Koontz, Rex, Erik Boot and Linnea Wren, “A Group of Related Titles from Structure 6E-1 at Chichen Itza,” p. 191.
    15. Brisko, Jo Ann Roman, “Maya Goddesses: By What Name do We Call Them?” p. 197.
    16. Johnson, Richard E. and Michel Quenon, “Comments on the Paris Codex Pages 23 and 24: A Maya Zodiac,” p. 207.
    17. Myerson, Sylvia, “La Mojarra Stela 1: The Pyramid Outline and the Reverse Images,” p. 229.
    18. Junell, Cathy and Brian Stross, “The Deer as Western Sun,” p. 239.
    19. Jones, Tom, “Notes on and Unprovenanced Maya Relief Panel,” p. 247.
  725. Clancy, Flora Simmons, Sculpture in the Ancient Maya Plaze: The Early Classic Period, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1999.
  726. Wright, Rita P., Gender and Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 1996.
    1. Bentley, Gillian R., “How Did Prehistoric Women Bear ’Man the Hunter’?: Reconstructing Fertility from the Archaeological Record,” p. 23.
    2. McGaw, Judith A., “Reconceiving Technology: Why Feminine Technologies Matter,” p. 52.
    3. Wright, Rita P., “Technology, Gender, and Class: Worlds of Difference,” p. 79.
    4. Costin, Cathy Lynne, “Exploring the Relationship Between Gender and Craft in Complex Societies: Methodological and Theoretical Issues of Gender Attribution,” p. 111.
    5. Brumfiel, Elizabeth M., “Figurines and the Aztec State: Testing the Effectiveness of Ideological Domination,” p. 143.
    6. Joyce, Rosemary A., “The Construction of Gender in Classic Maya Monuments,” p. 167.
    7. Romanowicz, Janet V. and Rita P. Wright, “Gendered Perspectives in the Classroom,” p. 199.
    8. Conkey, Margaret W. and Ruth E. Tringham, “Cultivating Thinking/Challenging Authority: Some Experiments in Feminist Pedagogy in Archaeology,” p. 224.
    9. Gero, Joan M., “Archaeological Practice and Gendered Encounters,” p. 251.
  727. Blackburn, Bonnie and Leofranc Holford-Strevens, The Oxford Companion to the Year: An Exploration of Calendar Customs and Time-Reckoning, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1999.
  728. Meeus, Jean, Mathematical Astronomy Morsels, Willman-Bell, Richmond VA, 1997.
  729. Perez-Higuera, Teresa, Medieval Calendars, Wiedenfeld & Nicolson, London, 1998.
  730. Spence, Lewis, The Myths of Mexico and Peru, Dover, New York, 1994 (Original publication 1913).
  731. Duffek, Karen, Bill Reid: Beyond the Essential Form, UBC Press, Vancouver, 1993.
  732. Owusu, Heike, Symbols of Native America, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., New York, 1999.
  733. Berlo, Janet C. and Ruth B. Phillips, Native North American Art, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1999.
  734. Bede, A History of the English Church and People, Dorset Press, New York, 1968.
  735. Latham, Lance, Standard C Date/Time Library, R & D Books, Lawrence KS, 1998.
  736. Maor, Eli, E: The Story of a Number, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ, 1994.
  737. Pasztory, Esther, Pre-Columbian Art, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998.
  738. Blanton, Richard E., Stephen A. Kowalewski, Gary M. Feinman and Laura M. Finsten, Ancient Mesoamerica: A Comparison of Change in Three Regions, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1993.
  739. Anderson, Lloyd, ed. The Paris Codex, Ecological Linguistics, Washington DC, 2001.
  740. Urton, Gary, The Social Life of Numbers, University of Texas Press, Austin, 1997.
  741. Hazen-Hammond, Susan, Spider Woman’s Web, Perigee, New York, 1999.
  742. Foster, Michael S. and Shirley Gorenstein, Eds., Greater Mesoamerica:  The Archaeology of West and Northwest Mexico, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, 2000.
    1. Gorenstein, Shirley and Michael S. Foster, “West and Northwest Mexico:  The Ins and Outs of Mesoamerica,” p. 3.
    2. Florance, Charles A., “The Late and Terminal Preclassic in Southeastern Guanajuato:  Heartland or Periphery?” p. 21.
    3. Braniff C., Beatriz, “A Summary of the Archaeology of North-Central Mesoamerica:  Guanajuato, Queretaro, and San Luis Potosi,” p. 35.
    4. Weigand, Phil C., “The Evolution and Decline of a Core of Civilization:  The Teuchitlan Tradition and the Archaeology of Jalisco,” p. 43.
    5. Pollard, Helen Perlstein, “Tarascans and Their Ancestors:  Prehistory of Michoacan,” p. 59.
    6. Pollard, Helen Perlstein, “Tarascan External Relationships,” p. 71.
    7. Mountjoy, Joseph B., “Prehispanic Cultural Development along the Southern Coast of West Mexico,” p. 81.
    8. Scott, Stuart D. and Michael S. Foster, “The Prehistory of Mexico’s Northwest Coast:  A View from the Marismas Nacionales of Sinaloa and Nayarit,” p. 107.
    9. Kelley, J. Charles, “The Aztatlan Mercantile System:  Mobile Traders and the Northwestward Expansion of Mesoamerican Civilization,” p. 137.
    10. Betts, Perter F. Jimenez and J. Andrew Darling, “Archaeology of Southern Zacatecas:  The Malpaso, Juchipila, and Valparaiso-Bolanos Valleys,” p. 155.
    11. Foster, Michael S., “The Archaeology of Durango,” p. 197.
    12. Bradley, Ronna Jane, “Recent Advances in Chihuahuan Archaeology,” p. 221.
    13. Villalpando, Maria Elisa, “The Archaeological Traditions of Sonora,” p. 241.
    14. Spence, Michael W., “From Tzintzuntzan to Paquime:  Peers of Peripheries in Greater Mesoamerica?” p. 255.
  743. Maudsley, A.P., Biologia Centrali-Americana; or, Contributions to the Knowledge of the Fauna and Flora of Mexico and Central America.  Archaeology.  Volumes I and II, Plates.  Milpatron, New York, 1974.
  744. Maudsley, A.P., Biologia Centrali-Americana; or, Contributions to the Knowledge of the Fauna and Flora of Mexico and Central America.  Archaeology.  Volumes III and IV, Plates.  Milpatron, New York, 1974.
  745. Maudsley, A.P., Biologia Centrali-Americana; or, Contributions to the Knowledge of the Fauna and Flora of Mexico and Central America.  Archaeology.  Volume V, Text.  Milpatron, New York, 1974.
  746. Maudsley, A.P., Biologia Centrali-Americana; or, Contributions to the Knowledge of the Fauna and Flora of Mexico and Central America.  Archaeology.  Volume VI, Appendix, by J.T. Goodman.  Milpatron, New York, 1974.

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